Posts Tagged ‘Platonic Love’

►Mythology: “Psychopomps, Border Crossers and Guiders of Souls”🌟:

“Souls on the Banks of the Acheron”, by Adolf Hirémy-Hirschl. 1898

____________________________________________________________________________________

⇒♦ Introduction. Definition of Psychopomp and Sketch of this post:

A Psychopomp is a god, spirit, or demon who is responsible for guiding the spirits of the dead on their journey to the underworld. His role is not to judge the deceased, but simply to provide safe passage. The word comes from the Greek   ψυχοπομπός, which means “conductor of souls.” Psycho– (ψυχο) originally meant “of, or relating to the soul,” while pomps (πομπός) meant “guide” or “conductor.”

Classical examples of a Psychopomp are the ancient Egyptian god Anubis, the Greek ferryman CharonHermes and Hecate, the Roman god Mercury (equivalent: Hermes in Greek Mythology) and Archangel Gabriel in the Catholic religion, to name the most important ones.

Firstly, in the first section (I), let´s look at some examples of Psychopomps in Mythology.

By the ending of the post (section II), I´ll outline with Carl Jung´s ideas concerning “Psychopomp”. I´ll say here in advance that, according to Jung, the figure of the Psychopomp acts not only as a bridge between Life and Death,  It is also an intermediary between Conscious and the Unconscious, necessarily but not exclusively fostered thanks to the perfect Integration of Anima (each man´s feminine nature) and Animus (each woman´s male principle) in the form of the “Self”. 

I.⇒♦Some Examples of Psychopomps in Mythology:

1.⇒♦Anubis:

Egyptian God Anubis.

He was originally an egyptian god of the Underworld, but became associated specifically with the embalming process and funeral rites. 

He was usually depicted as a canine or a man with a canine head. He was often presented in black, a color that symbolized both rebirth and the discoloration of the corpse after embalming.

One of his most important roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He was tasked with guiding souls to Duat, the Egyptian underworld, where they would be judged according to their lives. Under Anubis’ supervision, their hearts were weighed against a feather representing truth.

If their hearts were lighter than the feather, they were allowed to continue on. If their hearts were “too heavy with sins”, Anubis would give it to Ammit, a demon known as the “Devourer of the Dead”, who would consume it.

In the Ptolemaic period (350–30 BC), when Egypt became a Hellenistic kingdom ruled by Greek pharaohs, Anubis was merged with the Greek god Hermes, becoming Hermanubis. The two gods were considered similar because they both guided souls to the afterlife.

2.⇒♦Thoth:

In ancient Egypt,  Thoth created script. Besides, he was connected with the Moon and thus considered the Ruler of the Night.

Hermes Trismegistus may be a representation of the syncretic combination of the Greek god Hermes and the Egyptian god Thoth, egyptian God of Knowledge. Hence, the two gods were worshipped as one in what had been the Temple of Thoth in Khemnu, which the Greeks called Hermopolis.

3.⇒♦Hermes:

Among Ancient Greeks, God Hermes had many attributes and represented many things. Hermes was the Olympian god of herds and flocks, travellers and hospitality, roads and trade, thievery and cunning, heralds and diplomacy, astronomy and astrology. He was also a god of science and wisdom, art, speech, eloquence. And, most importantly: “the God of Writing”

Furthermore, he was the herald and personal messenger of Zeus, and also the guide of the dead who led souls down into the underworld. This last job required the fleet-footed Hermes to be able to traverse between worlds with ease, which probably explains why he’s also the god of border crossings. It was also his job to lead the souls of the dead to the entrance of Hades, where they waited for Charon to pick them up. Hermes was the only Olympian god able to visit Heaven, Earth, and Hades, a fact he enjoyed bragging about to the other gods. 

4.⇒♦Charon:

Charon was the ferryman of the dead, an underworld daimon (spirit) in the service of Hades. He received the shades of the dead from Hermes,  who gathered them from the upper world and guided them to the shores of  River Acheron.

Unlike many other Psychopomps, Charon did not do this for free; he required a donation to be given to him.

The fee for his service was a single obol, a coin  a silver coin worth a sixth of a drachma, which was placed in the mouth of a corpse at burial (It was known as Charon´s obol).

People who are unable to pay the fee were doomed to wander the shores of the river for a hundred years.

Since most Greeks, understandably, did not want to wander in the mists and marshes, they buried their dead with coins to pay the ferryman; this tradition is still retained in many parts of Greece.

5.⇒♦Hecate:

Hecate was the Greek Goddess of  Crossroads, Magic, Witchcraft, The Night, Ghosts and Necromancy. 

She was sometimes portrayed as wearing a glowing headdress of stars, while in other legends she was described as a “Phosphorescent Angel” of the Underworld.

Hecate’s magic was that of death and the underworld, but also of oracles, of herbs and poisons, protection and guidance. 

Her torches provided light in the darkness, much like the Moon and Stars do at night, taking the seeker on a journey of initiation, guiding them as the psychopomp, like she guided Persephone on her yearly journey to and from Hades

Hecate’s retinue included the souls of those who died before their time, particularly children, or who were killed by force.

As she was the goddess of purifications and expiations, she was usually accompanied by Stygian dogs, from Hades’ domains. Dogs were closely associated with Hecate in the Classical world. In art and in literature Hecate is constantly represented as dog-shaped or as accompanied by a dog. Besides, her approach was heralded by the howling of a dog.

6.⇒♦Thanatos:

Thanatos was the Ancient Greek personification of Death. He was a minor figure, usually depicted as a winged youth, carrying a sword. Besides, he was is almost universally shown with his brother, Hypnos, the God of Sleep.

Thanatos was regarded as merciless and indiscriminate, hated by – and hateful towards — mortals and gods alike.

According to Sigmund Freud, humans have a Life/Love instinct—which he named “Eros“—and a Death drive, which is commonly called  “Thanatos”. This postulated “Thanatos instinct” or “Death Drive” allegedly compels humans to engage in risky and self-destructive acts that could lead to their own death.

II.⇒♦Carl Jung´s Concept of “Psychopomp”: 

The Perfect Integration between Anima (Eros) and Animus (Logos):

In Jungian psychology, the Psychopomp is a mediator between the Unconscious and Conscious realms. 

Carl Jung used the word to refer to a psychic factor that mediated between the conscious and the unconscious. This might be personified in dreams and myths as a God/Goddesses, or even as an animal. The raven, for example, is seen in Celtic folklore to be a Psychopomp, and is a role that peeps out in Edgar Allan Poe´s poem “The Raven”. One specific mythological character is The Morrigan, a female figure from Irish mythology. She was associated with sovereignty, prophecy, war, and death on the battlefield. And, she often appeared in the form of a crow, flying above the warriors.

Back to the word “Psychopomp”, Jung didn´t alter the meaning of the original Greek word.

Anima and Animus.

But, he instead added the concepts of Anima and Animus, as  the ultimate connectors between the individual soul and purpose. 

Anima is a man´s feminine nature representing Eros or Love. Whilst Animus is a woman´s male image, representing Logos or Spirit.

Jung clarifies that he uses  Eros and Logos merely as conceptual aids to describe the fact that woman´s consciousness is characterized more by the connective quality of Eros than  by the discrimination and cognition associated with Logos. While, in men, Eros (the function of relationship) is usually less developed than Logos. 

The Anima-Animus complex reminds us of the Yin Yang symbol, which basically describes how seemingly opposite or contrary forces may actually be complementary, interconnected, and interdependent.

Jung says: “When Yang had reached its greatest strength, the dark power of Yin is born within its depths, for night begins at midday when Yang breaks up and begins to change into Yin”. (Carl Yung, CW 13. Alchemical Studies. P. 13)

The union of Anima and Animus, for Jung, is the Self; and, in symbolic terms: the Psychopomp as mediator between the Conscious and the Unconscious.

The perfect integration of Anima and Animus, in the elevated role of Psychopomp, represents, somehow a gate to the Unconscious, which somehow reminds us of Plato´s Perfect Ideal of Love, as per his dialogue “Symposium”.

According to Jung, the Anima and Animus are the guardians of the threshold, because they are the bridge to the Unconscious. Through understanding projection, the opposites in the Anima/Animus complex can be united, ultimately releasing these forces to act as mediators between the Conscious and Unconscious standpoints.

This integration or union of opposites is symbolized by the Psychopomp, the main archetype of the Self.

The Self is defined by Jung as: “The totality of the Conscious and Unconscious Psyche”. (Carl Jung, CW 12, P. 247). Jung describes the Self as a perfect circumference: “The Self is not only the centre, but also the whole circumference which embraces both Conscious and Unconscious; it is the centre of this totality, just as the ego is the Centre of Consciousness. (Carl Jung. “Memories, dreams and reflections”, Page 398).

As to the Psychopomp, Carl Jung says: 

“For the Animus (Logos) when on his way, on his quest, is really a Psychopomps, leading the soul to the stars whence it came…  On the way back out of the existence in the flesh, the Psychopomp develops such a cosmic aspect, he wanders among the constellations, he leads the soul over the rainbow bridge into the blossoming fields of the stars”. (Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1229).

________________________________________________________________________________

♦Links Post:
https://goo.gl/JpQz5r
https://goo.gl/mj4JZP
http://go.shr.lc/2to2RWD
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychopomp
http://www.corupriesthood.com/the-morrigan/
https://arrowinflight.com/2013/08/11/psychopomp-and-circumstance/
http://humanityhealing.net/2011/05/multidimensional-healing-i-psychopomp/
https://carljungdepthpsychologysite.blog/2017/03/19/carl-jung-on-animus-anthology/

________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

This is a special section in which I will display all the awards I have received during 2017. To simplify, I will follow the same rules for all the awards as otherwise I wouldn´t be able to do it … 😉 Meaning: 1. Thank the blogger who have nominated you. 2. Display the logo on your blog. 3. Nominate at least 7 bloggers for each award and tell them about the nomination. As I often do, I will nominate bloggers who have previously nominated me for other awards, favorite bloggers, new followers and bloggers who have recently liked my posts. Please, know these choices are quite random, I am sorry I couldn´t include everyone! 😇 … As to my nominees, I will link back to one of their newest posts as an easier way to inform them about the nomination. If you have been nominated and want to follow along the nomination process, you´ll find your respective award in the gallery below, as the slideshare goes, click on it and save it (see award, per number). If you are a Free Award Blog, all is fine: just take this mention as a shout-out. 😀

1♦Thank you very much Baattyaboutbooks for bestowing me with the Blogger Recognition Award.

My Nominees for this award are: 1. Tea by Leaf 2. Sentinel of Phantasm 3. Inese 4. 3cstyle 5. Maria KethyProfumo  6. Aweni 7. Urbanbiharan. 🌟💫🌟

2♦Thank you very much Inese, from Making Memories for The Black Cat Blue Sea Award.

My Nominees for this award are: 1. Leggypeggy 2. Le dessous des mots 3. Wordsmusicandstories 4. Michaelstephenwills 5. Radhikasreflection 6. Queenyasaaawrites 7. Umacearenseescreveu. 🌟💫🌟

3♦Thank you very much Maria KethuProfumo for the Liebster Award. 

My Nominees for this award are: 1. Baattyaboutbooks  2. LifeBlog 3. Ijeoma 4. Shivangi Mishra 5. Undomestic Writer 6. Annika Perry 7. Ladyfromhamburg. 🌟💫🌟

4♦Thanks so much Ijeoma for thinking of me and bestowing me with the Mystery Blogger Award.

My Nominees for this award are: 1. Shehanne Moore 2. Tuesdays with Laurie 3. A Russian Affair 4. The Chicago Files 5. English language thoughts 6. Broad Blogs 7. Moody Here

5♦Thanks so much 3cstyle and LifeBlog for the Unique Blogger Award.

My Nominees for this award are: 1. Jeri Walker 2. Graffitiluxandmurals 3. Chasingart 4. Forgotten Meadows 5. I lost my Lens Cap 6. TravelTalesofLife 7. Leonivo. 🌟💫🌟

6♦Thank you very much Shivangi Mishra for bestowing me with the One Lovely Blog Award.

My Nominees for this award are: 1. Arohii 2. D.G.Kaye 3. Scvincent 4. Luciana Cavallaro 5. Brenda Davis Harsham 6. Mabel Kwong 7. Gildaspoems. 🌟💫🌟

7♦Thank you very much Undomestic Writer and Aweni for the Versatile Blogger Award.

My Nominees for this award are: 1. Colleen Chesebro 2. Kathleen Vail 3. Linnea Tanner 4. Sally G Cronin 5. Balroop Singh 6. Jeanleesworld 7. Impact Words.  🌟💫🌟

8♦Thanks so much (again) to Shehanne Moore for bestowing me with the Miranda Sings Award.

My Nominees for this award are: 1. Found In France 2. Luce 3. Incredible Poetry 4. Jazzizzin 5. Artibookreviews 6. Muddling through my middle age 7. Maryjdresselbooks. 🌟💫🌟

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

9♦ Last, but not least: Thanks so much Shehanne Moore for  thinking of me for the “Music that Means Something Challenge”. In this case, you have to choose five (5) special songs and add the respective videos if you wish. 

My Nominees for this musical challenge are: 1. Charlotte Hoather 2. Sylvester L.Anderson 3. It starts with a coffee 4. Wanderer haiku 5 Lifesfinewhine 6. Yadadarcyyada 7. Nishthaexploringlife.🌟💫🌟

My choices for Shehanne´s  “Music that Means Something, Challenge” (9♦) will be exclusively Lana del Rey´s songs. Lana is great. She often tells us a story, and to a certain extent we can all relate to her “characters”. Her songs often refer to summer memories, art, detachment, loneliness, random lovers, Love as an Ideal; self discovery and freedom…  😌 

These are my five (5) chosen videos by Lana del Rey: 1. Ride  2. Love 3. Change 4. Terrence Loves you 5. Carmen.

And… as a Bonustrack, I will also add five (5) more songs by Lana. In this case, “unreleased songs”. Here they go: 1. Every Man Gets his Wish 2. Queen of Disaster  3. Break my Fall  4. Because of You.  5. Cherry Blossom.

Check out the playlists for all the songs below. 💛⭐️💛

~~~•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~

🎼🎹►Five Official Songs by Lana Del Rey: 

🎼🎹►Five Unreleased Songs by Lana Del Rey: 

___________________________________________________________________________________

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

zandc

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

“Jupiter and Callisto” by François Boucher. In this painting Jupiter (Zeus) takes the form of Artemis/Diana (1759).

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

____________________________________________________________

Callisto (also known as Parrhasia)  was a daughter of the Arkadian King Lykaon and a hunting companion of the goddess Artemis (Also known as Cynthia, roman equivalent: Diana).

Callisto’s themes are instinct and flexibility. Her symbols are a bear, a willow branch and the constellation Ursa Minor.

Callisto wanted to preserve her virginity for as long as she remained in the company of the Huntress- Goddess.

“Callisto once belonged to the sacred circle of Hamdryades and huntress Diana (Artemis). She touched the goddess’ bow : `This bow I touch,’ she cried, `Be a witness to my virginity.’ Cynthia (Artemis) praised her, and said : `Keep the pledge you vowed and you will be my companions’ princeps. [Ovid, “Fasti” 2. 155 ff. (Roman poetry C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.)].~

But later on, she was seduced by the god Zeus (also known as Jove, roman equivalent: Jupiter), in the guise of the goddess Artemis.

The god transformed himself and took Diana’s (Artemis’)  form–assumed Diana’s dress and imitating her awoke the maid, and spoke in gentle tones, `What mountain slope, O virgin of my train, hath been thy chase?’ Which, having heard, Callisto, rose and said, `Hail, goddess! greater than celestial Jove! I would declare it though he heard the words’. Jove (Zeus) heard and smiled, well pleased to be preferred above himself, and kissed her many times, and strained her in his arms, while she began to tell the varied fortunes of her hunt… But when his ardent love was known to her, she struggled to escape from his embrace: ah, how could she, a tender maid, resist almighty Jove?… [Ovid, “Metamorphoses” 2. 409 – 531. (Roman epic C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.)].~ 

When her pregnancy was revealed in the bath, Callisto blamed the goddess of the offence. 

The Moon’s bent horns were rising from their ninth sojourn, when, fainting from her brother’s flames, the goddess of the chase observed a cool umbrageous grove, from which a murmuring stream ran babbling gently over golden sands. When she approved the spot, lightly she struck her foot against the ripples of the stream, and praising it began; `Far from the gaze of all the curious we may bathe our limbs, and sport in this clear water’. Quickly they undid their garments,–but Parrhasis (Callisto of Parrhasia) hid behind the others, till they knew her state… Cynthia (Artemis) in a rage exclaimed, `Away! Thou must not desecrate our sacred springs!’ And she was driven thence. [Ovid, “Metamorphoses” 2. 409 – 531. (Roman epic C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.)].~ 

Artemis, in her fury, transformed Callisto into a bear. Thus, the huntress became the hunted, somehow.

And lest her prayers and piteous words might move some listening god, and give remembrance, speech was so denied, that only from her throat came angry growls, now uttered hoarse and threatening. Still remains her understanding, though her body, thus transformed, makes her appear a savage bear… Over crags, in terror, she was driven by the cries of hounds; and many a time she fled in fear, a huntress from the hunters, or she hid from savage animals; forgetting her transformed condition. Changed into a bear, she fled affrighted from the bears that haunt the rugged mountains. [Ovid, “Metamorphoses” 2. 409 – 531. (Roman epic C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.)].~

Hunters then caught and delivered her and her son Arcas (which mans “bear”) to King Lykaon.

Sixteen years later Callisto, still a bear, encountered her son Arcas hunting in the forest. Just as Arcas was about to kill his own mother, Zeus averted the tragedy by placing mother and son amongst the stars as Ursa Major and Minor, respectively.

By fixing “those new made stars in the highest dome of space that circles the utmost axis of the world”  [Ovid, “Metamorphoses” 2. 409 – 531. (Roman epic C1st B.C. to C1st A.D.)].~ 

Hera was not pleased with this arrangement, especially since Callisto was another of her husband’s infidelities, so with one of the Nereids, i.e Thethys‘ help, they cursed these stars to circle in the skies forever. That’s why the two constellations are circumpolar, visible all year round.

_________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

Jupiter and Callisto. Two paitings.

“Jupiter (Jupiter, shaped as Diana or Artemis) and Callisto. Progressions of Two paitings. 1) Painting with Cupid up on the left. “Jupiter in the guise of Diana and the nymph Callisto” by Pietro Liberi. (17th century). Painting with Cupid down on the left: “Diana and Callisto” by Jean Baptiste Marie Pierre. (17th century).

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

“Jupiter seduces Callisto.” by Peter Paul Rubens. (1673).

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

“Jupiter and Callisto” by Caesar van Everdingen (1655).

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

"Diana and Callisto" by Titian (1559). The painting depicts the moment when Callisto's pregnancy is discovered.

“Diana and Callisto” by Titian (1559). The painting depicts the moment when Callisto’s pregnancy is discovered.

guarda_griega1_2 (1)

____________________________________________________________

►Gallery: “Zeus and Callisto”:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

_________________________________________________________

Links Post:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callisto_%28mythology%29
http://thedailyhaiku.blogspot.com.ar/2009/10/ursa-major.html
http://www.windows2universe.org/mythology/ursa_major_greek.html
http://www.talesbeyondbelief.com/myth-stories/lovers-of-zeus.htm
http://www.pantheon.org/articles/c/callisto.html
http://www.theoi.com/Heroine/Kallisto.html 

___________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

_____________________________________________________________________________

poetry challenge

My blogger friend Marlyn Exconde from Kintal invited me to join her in the “Love in Ten Sentences~Poetry Challenge”.

I am gladly joining her for National Poetry Month. However, I took some creative licenses.

The original prompt strictly states that you should: a) Write about love using only ten (10) lines. b) Use “love” in each line. c) Each line has to be only be four (4) words long. d) Nominate ten (10) bloggers for the challenge.

I have read many poems following the Love in Ten Sentences Challenge and, as far as I am concerned, these points were put aside, or not even mentioned. 

My poem doesn’t follow the prompts of the original Challenge, either. That’s why I will nominate ten (10) bloggers, as I suggest a new version of the Challenge, therefore called: “Non-Love in More than Ten Sentences”

•~~~ ۩۩ ~~~•

Rules for the “Non-Love in More than Ten Sentences Challenge”:

If you are in, you only have to link back to my blog and add your poem on your blog, making sure to include:

~The word “Love”, at least once.

~At least one adverb. (For instance: unavoidably).

~At least one quote or motto, marked by quotation marks.

As to the poem and particularly as to Non- Love, the topics might be related to: a break up, betrayals of love, an impossible love, amorous quarrels, an unrequited love, disappointment or disbelief with regard to love, and so on… 

Finally, you shall nominate ten (10) bloggers for them to follow up this challenge, if they want to.

Being all this said,  these are my nominees for the “Non-Love in More than Ten Sentences”~ Poetry Challenge (in no particular order):

1. Poetic Parfait 2. Americana Injustica  3. Echoes and Reflections 4. Rosey 5. Forgotten Meadows 6. Sylvester L. Anderson 7. Eva Poetex 8. Friendly Fairy Tales 9. House of Heart 10. Poemimage.

___________________________________________________________________________________

epiphany

To feel that each day unraveled the days ahead to come,
those days we would never share,
being perfect strangers, like we were…. 
Yet, I wanted to believe.“Extraordinary findings occur
among ordinary circumstances”, I used to say.
~~~
Nevertheless, we moved away from that ethereal place,
even before we would have met there.
Uninterruptedly guessing our faces. 
Unimpeachably bitter shades.
Disappointment unmatched. 
~~~
No witness, just ourselves.
The absence of light, our own ghosts.
Darkness awaiting, full of promises.
needlessly looking for words.
Quiescent, naive expectations.
~~~
Equally symmetric, our paths were in fact bypaths,
leading to the Shelter of Lost Memories,
where silence was the only Master, 
and rough seas, a recurrent blurry image.
Always breaking forth. And back…
~~~
“Be aware of what you dream”,
We vanished precisely when we were getting closer
under a veil of  pale lights, 
that I had thought weren’t anything
but an Epiphany of Love.
~~~
Needless to say, it wasn’t… 
Nor we were those perfect strangers. Vain projections.
All what now remains is an unrelenting gloomy feeling.
And that never-failing call of what was destined to be,
which, as unreachable as it is, unavoidably fades to nothing…
~~~

 ©2015 Amalia Pedemonte/Aquileana.~

guardaawesomeglitter

______________________________________________________________________________

lovemovie1

This photograph is from an argentine movie called “Siete para un Secreto”(“Seven for a secret”), dated 1947. The main actor and the man above, was Carlos Cores, my grandpa´s cousin. On the other hand, my grandpa, Lito Pedemonte, was a militar. The interesting fact here is that Cores is wearing my grandpa´s military uniform. It seems that Carlos Borcosque, the film director, was trying to reduce budgets, somehow. [Credit Photo: Amalia Pedemonte ©]

________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

________________________________________________________________________________________

threeawards2________________________________________________________

Three new awards!… I would like to thank Angie from Family Love Does More for nominating me for a Very Inspiring Blogger Award.

I also want to thank Martes de Cuento for nominating my blog for another Very Inspiring Blogger Award.

Finally, last but least, I’d love to thank Shehanne Moore for nominating me an Infinity Dreams Award.

These three bloggers are really worth checking out!… So please, give it a shot and visit these blogs, like the posts and follow them!… 😀

Note: For the three awards, I will nominate blogs I have recently came across and like, recent followers and/or plussers. Also, I am changing the logos so that way I can include new awards among mine… And, finally, I will follow the nomination process without answering questions or mentioning facts about me…. 

_______________________________________________________________________________________

►Rules for these Three Awards:

♠ Thank the person who nominated you for the award.
♠ Add the logo to your post.
♠Nominate ten (10) bloggers you admire and inform your nominees by commenting on their blogs. 

_______________________________________________________________________________________

►I) Nominees~Very Inspiring Blogger Award (Typing Machine Version):

guarda_griega1_5-2

very-inspiring-blogger-award cool

guarda_griega1_5-2

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 1. Shehanne Moore 2. Martes de Cuento 3. Peg-o-Leg’s Ramblings 4. Bodhirose’s Blog 5. A Dystopian Fantasy 6. El Eco de tus Palabras 7. Art and Life Analysis 8. Diana Douglas 9. Galiana 10. Living the Dream

_______________________________________________________________________________________

►II) Nominees~Very Inspiring Blogger Award (Glitter Version):

guarda_griega1_5-2

biba1

guarda_griega1_5-2

_______________________________________________________________________________________

 1. Family Love Does More 2. En Humor Arte 3. Summerfield84’s English Blog 4. The Road to Serendipity 5. Ms. Mouse Cleans House 6. Auntie B’s Wax 7. Pensando en la Oscuridad 8. Casey Comments 9. Bloc de Notas 10. Amabile11

_______________________________________________________________________________________

►III) Nominees~ The Infinity Dreams Award:

guarda_griega1_5-2

infinitydreamsaward

guarda_griega1_5-2

_______________________________________________________________________________________

1. Pendragon Photos 2. Inking The Thinking 3. Cathy Sultan Blog 4. If I Could Talk I’d Tell You 5. Course of Mirrors 6. Susanne Leist 7. Sand Castle 8. Tails Around the Ranch 9. Yonezawa723 10. Life as we see it.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

guardaglittering

________________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

►Art / Mythology: “The Loggia of Psyche” at The Villa Farnesina

(Frescoes Based on the Myth Of Eros and Psyche):

guarda_griega1_3

;;;

“The Loggia of Psyche” (Villa Farnesina, Rome. 16th Century).

guarda_griega1_3

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

The Villa Farnesina is placed in the Trastevere area of Rome on the Via della Lungara along the river Tiber.

It was designed by Baldassare Perluzzi between 1508 and 1512 for the banker, Agostino Chigi who was in love with his mistress Francesca Ordeaschi to whom he finally married in 1519.

After Chigi, the villa was purchased by the Farnese family and connected by a bridge across the Tiber to the huge Palazzo Farnese on the opposite bank.

The walls related to the Loggia of Phsyche were frescoed by several noted artists, most importantly Raphael, but it’s the ceiling that illustrates Psyche and Eros’ story.  

Scholars suggest that the story cycle alludes to Chigi’s own life, and his recent marriage.

Although the preparatory drawings and the general conception of the stories are by Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (also known as Raphael (1483/1520), the bulk of the painting was carried out by his pupils, notably Giovanni da Udine (who painted the rich plant festoons of the frame) with the collaboration of Giulio Romano, Raffaellino del Colle and Gianfrancesco Penni. 

Two frescoes on the ceiling depict incidents in the story of Eros and Psyche which took place in heaven.

Eros (Roman equivalent: Cupid) fell in love with Psyche and he abducted her.

Then, they had sexual relationships in total darkness because Eros had forbidden her to look at him.

As Aphrodite (Roman equivalent: Venus) was jealous of Psyche’s Beauty, she imprisoned his son, Eros, in her palace and forbade her to see him. At the end, Aphrodite accepted a deal, telling Psyche that she had to accomplish four tasks in order to see her beloved again.

After Psyche had undergone many difficult trials, Zeus made her immortal, and allowed her to marry Eros.

The Eros and Psyche myth corpus might be considered an  allegory for the ascent of the soul to immortality through love (especially love of beauty), based on Plato’s dialogue “Symposium” through Diotima’s “Ladder of Love”. 

By going through it, one will ascend from loving particular kinds of beauty to loving Beauty itself, from which all beautiful things derive their nature.

According to this analogy, Beauty is related to Love. Besides, Beauty itself is a Form or Idea, which  always exists, not coming into being or ceasing to be, nor increasing nor diminishing. Thus, Beauty will not appear in certain bodies in particular: it will appear in itself and by itself, independent of everything else. 

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

►”Loggia di Psyche” (Sequential Gallery):

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2

Venus and Cupid

“Venus and Cupid” by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

•In this fresco, Aphrodite (Roman equivalent: Venus) shows her son Eros (Roman equivalent Cupid) who is the young woman who was defying her own Beauty. According to the original version of the myth, Aphrodite, The Goddess of Beauty, asked Eros to poison men’ souls in order to kill off their desire for Psyche.

guarda_griega1_4

"Cupid and the Three Graces" by Giulio Romano (1517-18).

“Cupid and the Three Graces” by Raphael’s collaborator Giulio Romano (1517-18).

•Here we can The Three Graces on the clouds listening as young Eros relates the story of Psyche and his mother Aphrodite’s initial opposition – jealous of Psyche’s beauty – to mortal Psyche as his lover and eventual wife, as Apuleius originally tells in “The Golden Ass”.

The Three Graces were also known in Greek Mythology as Charites and they were goddesses related to charm, beauty, and creativity.

guarda_griega1_2

Venus (Aphrodite), Ceres (Demeter) and Juno (Hera) by Raphael with Giovanni da Udine's collaboration.

Venus (Aphrodite), Ceres (Demeter) and Juno (Hera) by Raphael with Giovanni da Udine’s collaboration. (1517-18).

•This detail from the vault of the Loggia shows Venus (Greek equivalent: Aphrodite, Goddess of Love and Beauty), Ceres,(Greek equivalent: Demeter, Goddess of the Harvest) and Juno (Greek equivalent: Hera, Zeus’ wife and sister and Goddess of Marriage and Childbirth ).

In this spandrel the group of three goddesses is divided.

Venus has learned of the secret affair and, driven by wrath, is seeking support from her female friends. But they both show little sympathy for her wrath and laments.

guarda_griega1_4

Venus on the Chariot Pulled by Doves

“Venus on the Chariot Pulled by Doves” by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

•In this spandrel we can see Goddess Aphrodite (Roman equivalent: Venus), on a chariot and pulled by Doves. The chariot might be related with the allegory of ascendant Beauty, whilst the doves were specific attributes of the Goddess.

guarda_griega1_2

Psyche Brings a Vessel up to Venus/Aphrodite by Giulio Romano (1517-18).

“Psyche Brings a Vessel up to Venus/Aphrodite” by Giulio Romano (1517-18).

guarda_griega1_2

“Venus and Psyche” by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

“Venus and Psyche” by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

•This two frescoes are linked to the fourth task ordered to Psyche by Aphrodite.

As the narrative relates of her ordeals commanded by Aphrodite, Psyche is taken to Aphrodite carrying the vessel she thinks holds Persephone’s beauty but actually holds deadly “Sleep of the Innermost Darkness, the night of Styx”.

Psyche opens the box desiring to be beautiful for Eros and restored to him. In doing so, disobeying Aphrodite, she swoons toward death, needing to be revived by Eros.

guarda_griega1_4

Cupid and Jupiter (on the left). Psyche and Jupiter (on the right).

Cupid and Jupiter (on the left). Psyche and Jupiter (on the right). By Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

•In these frescoes we can see Zeus, the ruler of the Olympian gods (Roman equivalent: Jupiter) with Eros (Roman equivalent: Cupid) on the left and Psyche on the right.

The Father of Gods advises them. His attitude seems to be more wrathful towards Eros, as he is holding his chin while he is staring at him. By contrast, he looks at Psyche with an indulgent and affable gesture.

guarda_griega1_2

Mercury

“Mercury” (Hermes) by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

guarda_griega1_2

"Mercury Brings Psyche up to Olympus" by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

“Mercury Brings Psyche up to Olympus” by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

•In these two frescoes we can see Hermes (Roman equivalent: Mercury) who was the messenger of the gods and guide of dead souls to the Underworld. Hermes was also well known for performing duties for Father of Gods.

As a matter of fact, Zeus appreciated Hermes’ wits highly and always asked for Hermes’ assistance throughout his decisions. 

In Apuleius’ Eros and Psyche story, Hermes even carries Psyche to heaven and the marriage banquet, just as seen in the first frescoe below.

guarda_griega1_4

Wedding Banquet of Cupid and Psyche

“Wedding Banquet of Cupid and Psyche” by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

guarda_griega1_4

“The Council of Gods” by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

“The Council of Gods” by Raphael and collaborators (1517-18).

guarda_griega1_4

“Wedding Banquet of Cupid and Psyche” and “The Council of the Gods” (Detail). By Rapahel and collaborators (1517-18).

“Wedding Banquet of Cupid and Psyche” and “The Council of the Gods” (Detail). By Rapahel and collaborators (1517-18).

•The conclusion of the Psyche and Eros story takes place in two broad format paintings in the vault panel.

Raphael depicts the council of the gods in which Zeus (Roman equivalent: Jupiter) decides to accept Psyche and Hermes (Roman equivalent: Mercury) gives her the elixir of immortality.

Then the wedding is celebrated. The groupings of figures spread out in a lively way. The communal life of the gods is unfolded in a characterization of their all human, too human feelings.-

________________________________________________________________________________________________

►Paul Hindemith, “Amor und Psyche”, Villa Farnesina, Raphael:

[Note: The first fresco appearing in the video is not part of the ceiling frescoes composing “The Loggia of Psyche”. Its name is “The Triumph of Galatea” and it was completed about 1514 by Raphael for the Villa Farnesina].

________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_1

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

►Links Post:
http://www.wga.hu/html_m/r/raphael/5roma/4a/
http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~mjoseph/CP/ICP.html
http://www.bluffton.edu/~sullivanm/farnesina/farnesina.html
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Loggia_of_Psyche_(Villa_Farnesina,_Rome)
http://comminfo.rutgers.edu/~mjoseph/CP/loggia.html
http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/symposium/section11.rhtml
http://www.electrummagazine.com/2012/06/the-villa-farnesina-jewel-of-renaissance-rome/

________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_1

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

♠Plato´s Dialogue, “The Symposium”:

“On Platonic Love and The Myth of the Androgyne”:

Symadro39

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

“The Symposium” ( Συμπόσιον) is a dialogue by Plato dated c. 385–380 BC. 

Plato sets the action in a symposium hosted by the poet Agathon to celebrate his first victory in a dramatic competition, the Dionysia of 416 BC. Each man must deliver an encomiun, a speech in praise of Love (Eros).   Each participant, by means of very personal expositions, adds something to a body that at the end is developed by Socrates. 

The dialogue concerns itself at one level with the genesis, purpose and nature of love, and (in latter-day interpretations) is the origin of the concept of Platonic Love

Platonic love is a type of Love that is chaste and non-sexual. This idea is also examined in this dialogue. Of particular importance is the speech of Socrates, relating the ideas attributed to the prophetess Diotima, which present love as a means of ascent to contemplation of the divine. For Diotima, and for Plato generally, the most correct use of love of other human beings is to direct one’s mind to love of divinity.

The dialogue´s  structure consists in seven major speeches which are delivered by: 1) Phaedrus (speech begins 178a): He was an Athenian aristocrat. Pausanias  (speech begins 180c): He was a legal expert. 3) The pshysician Eryximachus. 4) Aristophanes, a comic playwright (speech begins 189c). 5) Agathon (speech begins 195a): He a tragic poet, host of the banquet. 6) Socrates  (speech begins 201d): He was a Philosopher and Plato’s teacher. 7) Alcibiades (speech begins 214e), who was a prominent Athenian statesman and orator.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

♠Aristophanes speech: “The Myth of the Androgyne”: (To Read the excerpt from “The Symposium” click here)

Before launching his speech, Aristophanes warns the group that his praise to love may be more absurd than funny. His speech is an explanation of why people in love say they feel “whole” when they have found their love partner.

Aristophanes’ speech comes in the form of a myth.

This creation myth places humans of all three genders (androgynous, male, and female) in a primeval state of eternal bliss. However, we grew insolent in our blissful state and refused to properly honor the gods (and even tried to pursue them in their mountainous home). As punishment, we were split in two. Those with a “male” nature (the Children of the Sun) became homosexual men; those with a “female” nature (the Children of the Earth) became homosexual women; and the androgynes (Children of the Moon) became heterosexuals.

These creatures were very powerful and vigorous and made threatening attacks on the gods. The gods did not want to destroy them because they would then forfeit the sacrifices humans made to them, so Zeus decided to cut each person in two.

This is the origin of our instinctive desire for other human beings. Those who are interested in members of the opposite sex are halves of formerly androgynous people, while men who like men and women who like women are halves of what were formerly whole males and females.

Given that we are all separate, when we find our other half, we are lost in an amazement of love that cannot be accounted for by a simple desire for sex Love is the name that we give to our desire for wholeness, to be restored to our original nature.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Sin1

________________________________________________________________________________________________

palasateneamarco

Just something to highlight: Have you ever thought that the expression “Meet My Half  Orange” could be linked with Aristophanes’s speech in this dialogue by Plato. And the same applies for “Soulmate”. Just for the record: Plato and Aristotle have argued about all the main philosophical topics ever, so their texts are all well worth reading, Aquileana.

halfor

ora

Where is My Half Orange?.-

________________________________________________________________________________________________

Plato (427 BC /347 BC).-

Plato (427 BC /347 BC).-

______________________________________________________________________________________________

♠Read “The Symposium”, by Plato (Complete Text):

Click on the book cover above to read "The Symposium" by Plato.-

Click on the book cover to read “The Symposium” by Plato.-

______________________________________________________________________________________________

Symandro25

Image of  an androgyne, detail on ancient greek amphora.-

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

Symadrog33

Drawings of androgynous, dated Middle Age.-

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Nota a los lectores en castellano: Este tema ya ha sido tratado en el blog. 

Para consultarlo hacer click sobre el siguiente enlace: Platón: “El Banquete”: “El Mito del Andrógino”.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

♠Bonustrack: Hedwig and the Angry Inch: “Origin of Love”: 

This song is based on Plato’s Symposium (myth of the androgyne). Check out the lyrics.

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

♠Links Post: 

http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/symposium/section6.rhtml 
http://www.connellodonovan.com/hen.html 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symposium_(Plato)
http://outre-monde.com/2010/09/25/platonic-myths-the-myth-of-aristophanes/ 
http://www.laphamsquarterly.org/voices-in-time/platos-other-half.php?page=all

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

♠Last but not least: The Cracking Chrispmouse Bloggywog Award. 

Thanks Maxima for nominating me for this beautiful award

The Cracking Chrispmouse Bloggywog Award.-

The Cracking Chrispmouse Bloggywog Award.-

________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Rules of the Award:

1. Display the award logo on your blog /Ubicar el logo del premio en el blog
2. Link back to the person who nominated you/ Enlazar a la persona que te ha nominado.
3. State 7 things about yourself/ Numerar 7 cosas sobre tí.
4. Nominate 15 (more or less) other bloggers for this award and link to them/ Nominar a 15 otros bloggers y enlazarlos
5. Notify those bloggers of the nomination and the award requirements/ Notificar a los nominados de la nominación y de las reglas.

My Nominees Are: Clowie´s Corner,Pure Haiku, Family answers fast, Cat Forsley Me, Salvela, Rotze Mardini, Syl65, E-tinkerbell´s blog,Bastet and Sekhmet´s LibraryLetras, pasión y más, D. A. Lavoie, Nómadas, Gigi papillon rose, Mon coin du français, El Mirador

If you don´t want to get awards over your blog, you can take it as a gesture of recognition for your great job as a blogger. Cheers, Aquileana 🙂

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

Raiplant SL

Producción de plantas Hortícolas y Ornamentales

FaCtoPoINt

This blog is all about #full of facts,word,thoughts,lessons,pro-tips and many more..

Brad's Journal

Hi Everyone! How yo doin! Im new to blogging. 😅😆😊

Babbini Marco

Il Ciclo Magico di Gredin

Desenrola Cordeiro

Só Proseando

Sweet & Nice things

Blog over: lifestyle,beauty,fashion en meer!

Jazzi Ryan Ranes ~ The Sensuous Poetic

Disseminator of Anomalous Information. Curator of Letters, Word Maker, Poet, Freethinker. I am 👇💪👆

Te Descrevi

"em alguns pesamentos soltos"

Get your own style

Hi everyone and welcome to my blog ! I'm excited to be part of the Wordpress blog, which I hope will be a wonderful way for all of us to share our ideas of how we see, and hopefully can shape, the world around us. I’ve been blogging on lifestyle, nature, and development on my personal site (https://getyurownstyle.wordpress.com) for some time. I think its the best way I can connect my thoughts with the people throughout the world. My time living throughout Asia has shaped my beliefs on the importance of local and community efforts in spurring development and shaping our own shared future.

Positive Side Of The Coin

Not just live and let live, but live and help live

Retro experiencia

Una mirada a la comunicación política

Mythos

Fun Facts about Ancient Cultures, Mythology and Second Life

Cengiz Selçuk

Kişisel Seyahat Bloğu

Esti crestin?

“Prin aceasta vor cunoaşte toţi că sunteţi ucenicii Mei, dacă veţi avea dragoste unii pentru alţii”

Histoire de l'Art et du Sacré

Histoire de l'art, civilisations, chefs-d'œuvre, mythes...

UNSER WORThaus

mit einem Wimpernschlag deiner Zeit bewegst du meine Welt. © Chr.v.M.

Domenick Style

Love and Society Life

%d bloggers like this: