Posts Tagged ‘“Phaedrus”’

zeusganymede

guarda_griega1_3-1-1-1 (1)

“The Abduction of Ganymede” by Eustache Le Sueur (1650).

guarda_griega1_3-1-1-1 (1)

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Ganymede pouring Zeus a libation. 480 BC.

Ganymede pouring Zeus a libation. 480 BC.

Ganymede was a Trojan prince in Greek mythology, known for his beauty. He was the son of the king Tros of Dardania, after whom Troy took its name, and Callirrhoe.

According to the myth, Zeus spotted Ganymede while the latter was attending to his father’s flocks and he became enchanted with his looks. Therefore, he took the form of turned into an eagle (Source: A Wing and A Day) and abducted Ganymede, bringing him to Mount Olympus.

In Olympus, Zeus granted him eternal youth and immortality and the office of cupbearer to the gods. From then on, Ganymede became water bearer to the Gods.

To compensate his father, Zeus  offered him the best horses possible, and told him that his son would now be immortal and serve as a cupbearer for the gods, as well as a lover for him:

“Ganymedes now, mixing the nectar, waits in heaven above, though Juno [Hera] frowns, and hands the cup to Jove [Zeus]”. (Ovid, Metamorphoses 10. 152).~

Almost all gods were content with Ganymede, except for Hera, who felt jealousy.

The idea of Ganymede being the cupbearer of Zeus subsequently gave rise to his identification with the divinity who was believed to preside over the sources of the Nile, and of his being placed by astronomers among the stars under the name of Aquarius, which is associated with that of the Eagle.

Aquarius constellation is symbolized by the water carrier or the water bearer. The sun passes through this constellation from mid February to mid March.

There is another constellation also related to this greek myth, and it is called Aquila, which is the latin word for “eagle”. Needless to say that Aquila was the eagle that in Greek mythology actually bore Ganymede (Aquarius) up to Mt. Olympus. The eagle was also the thunderbolt carrier for Zeus.

Besides, Ganymede is the largest moon of Jupiter and in the Solar System. Still an extra fact is that according to observations made with the Hubble Space Telescope, scientists have recently found that the largest moon in the Solar System is hiding an ocean under its surface.

“[Constellation] Aquila (Eagle). This is the eagle which is said to have snatched Ganymede up and given him to his lover, Jove [Zeus]. And so it seems to fly above Aquarius, who, as many imagine, is Ganymede”. (Pseudo-Hyginus, Astronomica, 2. 16).~

Ganymede was frequently represented as the god of homosexual love, and as such appears as a playmate of the love-gods Eros (Love) and Himeros (Desire)”.

Ganymedes was sometimes describes as the “Eros” of homosexual love and desire. Plato calls him Himeros (Sexual Desire).

“And when his feeling continues and he is nearer to him and embraces him, in gymnastic exercises and at other times of meeting, then the fountain of that stream, which Zeus when he was in love with Ganymede named Himeros (Desire), overflows upon the lover, and some enters into his soul, and some when he is filled flows out again”. (Plato, Phaedrus 255).~

Plato also mentions this myth in his dialogue “Laws”, in which he relates it to homosexuality:

“One certainly should not fail to observe that when male unites with female for procreation the pleasure experienced is held to be due to nature, but contrary to nature, when male mates with male or female with female, and that those first guilty of such enormities were impelled by their slavery to pleasure. And we all accuse the Kretans of concocting the story about Ganymedes. Because it was the belief that they derived their laws from Zeus, they added on this story about Zeus in order that they might be following his example in enjoying this pleasure as well”. (Plato, Laws, 636c).~

On the other hand, the myth was a model for the Greek social custom of Paiderastia, the socially acceptable erotic relationship between a man and a younger man.

Ganymede was depicted in Greek vase painting as a handsome boy. In the abduction scene his attributes were usually a rooster (a lover’s gift), a hoop (a boy’s toy), or a lyre. When portrayed as the cup-bearer of the gods he is shown pouring nectar from a jug.

In poetry, Ganymede became a symbol for the beautiful young male who attracted homosexual desire and love.

In Baldassare Peruzzi´s panel of The Rape of Ganymede” (*see painting below) in a ceiling at the Villa Farnesina, Rome, Ganymede’s long blond hair and girlish pose make him identifiable at first glance, though he grasps the eagle’s wing without resistance.

_________________________________________________________________________________

(*) “The Rape of Ganymede” by Baldassare Peruzzi. Ceiling at the Villa Farnesina, Rome, (1514).

guarda_griega1_2-1

“The Kidnapping of Ganymede” by Peter Paul Rubens (17th century).

guarda_griega1_2-1

_________________________________________________________________________________

 _________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2-1

Zeus and Ganymede . Progressions of Two paitings. 1) Painting with  Zeus as an eagle

Zeus and Ganymede . Progressions of Two paitings. 1) Painting with Zeus as an eagle “Abduction of Ganymede” by Rembrandt (17th century). 2) Painting with Little Ganymede kissing Zeus: “Jupiter and Ganymede” by Nicolaes de Helt Stockade (17th century).

guarda_griega1_2-1

__________________________________________________________________________

guarda21

___________________________________________________________________________________

Links Post:
http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Ganymedes.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganymede_%28mythology%29
http://users.belgacom.net/bn061744/mgganymede.htm
https://awingandaway.wordpress.com/2015/02/02/ancient-flights-of-the-eternal-2/
https://www.nasa.gov/press/2015/march/nasa-s-hubble-observations-suggest-underground-ocean-on-jupiters-largest-moon/
https://www.lewrockwell.com/2014/07/jeremy-andenberg/15-constellations-every-man-should-know/

___________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1-1 (1)

_____________________________________________________________

threeawards4

I have been nominated for three awards. 

The One Lovely Blog Award,  from Inside the Life of Moi, the Creative Blogger Award, from Poetry and Chocolate and Books and the Very Inspiring Blogger Award, from Angelo’s Universe.

I want to thank these three bloggers and suggest you to please make sure to check out their blogs and follow them.thank you1

Note: For the three awards, I will nominate blogs I have recently came across and like, recent followers and/or plussers. Also, I am changing the logos so that way I can include new awards among mine… And, finally, I will follow the nomination process without answering questions or mentioning facts about me… 

___________________________________________________________________________________

►Rules for these Three Awards:

♠ Thank the person who nominated you for the award. 

♠ Add the logo to your post.

♠Nominate ten (10) bloggers you admire and inform them of the nomination. 

 _______________________________________________________________________________________

►I) Nominees~One Lovely Blog Award~

guarda_griega1_5-2 (1)

onelovely

guarda_griega1_5-2 (1)

1. Crissy Dean 2.Short Stories Diary 3. Italian Home Kitchen Blog 4. Robynchristi 5. Charlotte Bang Bang 6. Before Sundown 7. 100 Ways to Write 8. Yamarella 9. Poetic Darkness 10. From Midnight to Dawnlight.

__________________________________________________________________________________

►II) Nominees~Creative Blogger Award (Pencils Version)~

guarda_griega1_5-2 (1)

cba

guarda_griega1_5-2 (1)

1. Angelo’s Universe 2. Dorlanavann 3. Poems thrown in a shoebox 4. BlondiesBearista 5. Sesquiotica 6.Filling Spaces 7. Zen Scribbles 8. Comig East 9. Sinister Bend 10. Serenity in the City.

_______________________________________________________________________________

►III) Nominees~Very Inspiring Blogger Award (Soft Version)~

guarda_griega1_5-2 (1)

award6

guarda_griega1_5-2 (1)

1.Inside the Life of Moi 2. The Keys 3. Poetry and Chocolate and Books 4. The Writes of Woman 5. Ginger’s Grocery 6. Just Jen 7. Haiku Odyssey 8. Imagery of Light 9. A Little Blog of Books 10. A Writer’s Path.

_________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1-1 (1)

_________________________________________________________________

►Silvina Garré: “Palmas Azules Para Mí”:

~To Verónica Boletta, from the great Poetry Blog “En Humor Arte”~

_________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1-1 (1)

_________________________________________________________________

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

►Greek Mythology: “Phaeton, Helios’ Son”:

guarda_griega1_3

"Phaeton" by Gustave Moreau (1878).

“Phaeton” by Gustave Moreau (1878).

guarda_griega1_3

________________________________________________________________________________________________

Phaeton (derived from the greek verb phaethô, “to shine: “the shining” or “radiant one”)  was the young son of Helios and Clymene

According to the roman poet, Ovid, Phaethon was the son of Helios, the god of the Sun, and Clymene, an Oceanid Nymph,who was also mother of the Seven Heliad Nymphs (Paethon’ sisters) .

It was not until Phaethon reached a certain age, however, that he learned that his father was indeed the Sun-god. When he realized who  his father was, Phaethon decided to meet Helios. He therefore went on a journey to the East, where he found his father’s grand palace.

Phaeton begged his father to let him drive the chariot of the sun. 

Helios tried to talk him out of it by telling him that not even Zeus would dare to drive it, as the chariot was fiery hot and the horses breathed out flames.

But Phaeton insisted and at the end Helios reluctantly conceded to his son’s wishes.

When the day came, the fierce horses that drew the chariot felt that it was empty because of the lack of the sun-god’s weight, and went out of control, setting the earth aflame

Zeus quickly realized that this was a dangerous situation. So the ruler of the Greek gods threw a thunderbolt directly at Phaethon, hurling his flaming body into the waters of the river Eridanos.

His sisters, the Heliades, gathered on the banks, and in their mourning with transformed into amber-teared poplar trees.

After his death, Phaethon was placed amongst the stars as the constellation Auriga (“The Charioteer”).

Plato used a similar analogy to the one of Phaeton’s myth in his dialogue “Phaedrus”There, Plato presents the Analogy of the Chariot to explain the tripartite nature of the human soul.

In Plato’s Phaedrus, the charioteer joins a procession of gods, led by Zeus, on this trip into the heavens and have to try to successfully pilot the chariot, controllin and balancing the black and white horse.

When the chariot plummets to earth, the horses lose their wings, and the soul becomes embodied in human flesh. The degree to which the soul falls, and the “rank” of the mortal being it must then be embodied in is based on the amount of Truth it beheld while in the heavens.

As stated by this analogy, the  rational part of the soul is represented by the charioteer. The spirited part (Thymos) is represented by the white horse while the black horse symbolizes the appetitive part of the soul.

Besides, Phaeton’s myth has similarities with Icarus’ myth, which tells the tragic story of  Dedalus’ son, a young man who is driven to prove himself by reaching the Sun with waxed wings, regardless of the consequences. 

As in Icarus’ myth, Phaeton´s moral is to “take the middle way” by warning against heedless pursuit of instant gratification (represented in both myths by the horses. And, strictly following Plato’s definition in the “Phaedrus”, by the black horse, which represents man’s appetites ). 

The implicit aristotelian idea in these myths is that virtue is “a kind of moderation as it aims at the mean or moderate amount” (Aristotle’s Golden Mean). In this last sense both myths highlight the greek idea of Sophrosyne, which etymologically means healthy-mindedness and from there moderation guided by knowledge and balance. 

________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2

"The Fall of Phaeton" by Peter Paul Rubens  (1605).

“The Fall of Phaeton” by Peter Paul Rubens (1605).

guarda_griega1_2

Onthe Riht: . On the Left: “The Sun, or the Fall of Icarus” by Merry-Joseph Blondel (1819).

On the Right: “The Fall of Phaeton” by Peter Paul Rubens (1605). On the Left: “The Sun, or the Fall of Icarus” by Merry-Joseph Blondel (1819).

guarda_griega1_2

"Phaeton driving the sun-chariot"  by Nicolas Bertin (1720).

“Phaeton driving the sun-chariot” by Nicolas Bertin (1720).

guarda_griega1_2

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 ►Gallery: “Phaeton, Helios’ Son”:

________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2

"The fall of Phaeton" : From the series "The Metamorphoses" (Ovid) by Hendrik Goltzius (1588).

“The fall of Phaeton” : From the series “The Metamorphoses” (Ovid) by Hendrik Goltzius (1588).

guarda_griega1_2

"The Fall of Paethon" by Michelangelo (1533).

“The Fall of Paethon” by Michelangelo (1533).

guarda_griega1_2

________________________________________________________________________________________________

►Michelangelo Buonarotti, “The Fall of Phaeton”, a drawing based on Phaeton’s Myth (Last drawing above):

Description: At the top of the sheet, Jupiter sits on his eagle and hurls a thunderbolt at Phaethon, son of Apollo, who plunges from a horse-drawn chariot. Phaethon had asked to drive the chariot of the sun, but he lost control and to save the earth Jupiter destroyed him. Underneath, his sisters, the weeping Heliades, are changed into poplar trees while another relation, Cycnus, has become a swan. The reclining male figure is the river god, Eridanus into whose river (the River Po in Italy) Phaethon fell.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_1

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

►Suggested Poem “The Key to Unity” By Uncle Tree:

Click on the Image above to read Keith's Poem.

Click on the Image above to read Uncle Tree’s Poem.

guarda_griega1_3

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Links Post:
http://www.theoi.com/Titan/Phaethon.html
http://www.theoi.com/Titan/AsterPhaethon.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phaethon
http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/Phaethon
http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/pd/m/michelangelo,_fall_of_phaeton.aspx

________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_1

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

►Last but not Least: Three Awards: 

►Here are the Award Rules, which are the same for all the awards:

1) The nominee shall display the respective logo on her/his blog.

•Note: To get the logo just click on the one which corresponds among the ones appearing in the Gallery below.

This time I will nominate new followers and/or bloggers I have recently met or that I haven’ t nominated before.

2) The nominee shall nominate ten (10) bloggers she/he admires, by linking to their blogs and informing them about it.

►Aquí están las reglas comunes a todos los Premios:

1) Ubicar el logo del Premio que le corresponda en su blog.

2) Nominar a otros diez (10) bloggers, enlazando a sus respectivos blogs e informándolos de la nominación.

•Nota: Para obtener el logo, hacer click en la imagen que corresponda al mismo, de entre todas las que aparecen debajo.

En esta oportunidad nominaré a nuevos seguidores y/ a bloggers que conocí recientemente o que aún no he nominado.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Premio Dardos.

Premio Dardos.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

I) Black Blogger Award: I have received this award from Gorrión de Asfalto and Profecías Mayas del Fin del Mundo.Both Blogs worth checking out. The first blog features Cultural events, Poetry, Guests Posts, among the main categories. The second one has as its most important topics: Anthropology, Archeology and Mexico’s Ancient Civilizations Culture.

►My nominees for the Black Wolf Blogger Award are/Mis nominados para el Black Wolf Blogger Award son:

1.Ensayos y Poemas  2. Aquí no sobran las Palabras 3. Té, Chocolate, Café 4. Tintero y Pincel 5. Ser un Ser de Luz 6. Reescrituras 7. Ya Baki Entel Baki 8. Indahs 9. Toritto 10. Lens and Pens by Sally.

II) The Versatile Blogger Award: Micheline Walker nominated me for this award. Her blog truly stands out and it includes posts related with Art, Middle Age Literature, symbolism in art and texts and their interpretation.

I was also nominated for this award from the poetry blog Condena, Mis Poemas. If you like spanish you’d better check out poems over there (You can also use the translator!). Last but not least, I also got this one from the blog called Ritual de las Palabras, with interesting contents that include mainly brief stories and Literature in general.

►My nominees for the Versatile Blogger Award are/Mis nominados para el Versatile Blogger Award son:

1. 21 Shades of Blue 2. Lady Sighs 3. Anna: Prostor 4. Feline Alchemy 5. ABC of Spirit Talk 6. Word Dreams 7. Valentina Expressions 8. Les Rêves d’ Eugenie 9. Ramo di Parole 10. Geiko Usume.

III) Wonderful Team Member Readership Award: I got this nomination from the blog Ensayos y Poemas, which includes posts on Writing, reviews of books, Poetry and Sociology.

►My nominees for the Wonderful Team Member Readership Award are/Mis nominados para el Wonderful Team Member Readership Award son:

1. Micheline Walker  2. Gorrión de Asfalto 3. Profecías Mayas del Fin del Mundo 4.Condena, Mis Poemas 5. Sonu Duggal 6. Espace Perso de Georges 7. Family Life is More 8. Ruka de Colores 9. Le Bon Côté des Choses 10. Willowdot21

IV) Premio Dardos: He sido nominada para este Premio desde los blogs amigos en Castellano, Ser un Ser de Luz, Aquí no sobran las Palabras, Reescrituras, Tintero y Pincel y Té, Chocolate, Café. Todos estos son excelentes espacios, mayormente de Literatura, pero también de Arte, Meditación y cuestiones relacionadas con el Universo.

►Mis nominados para el Premio Dardos son:

1. Compartimos 2. De Partida 3. Postales del Futuro 4. Natan Vue 5. Corriendo en la Niebla 6. Clínica Creativa 7. Blog de Jack Moreno 8. Nascaranda 9. Debe de Haber 10. Personajes y Leyendas.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Thanks a lot for dropping by. Best wishes to everyone, Aquileana 😀

guarda_griega1_3

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

Plato’s “Phaedrus”: “The Allegory of the Chariot and The Tripartite Nature of the Soul”:

pl4

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

In the dialogue “Phaedrus”, Plato presents the allegory of the chariot to explain the tripartite nature of the human soul or psyche. 

The chariot is pulled by two winged horses, one mortal and the other immortal.

The mortal, black horse is deformed and obstinate. Plato describes the horse as a “crooked lumbering animal, put together anyhow… of a dark color, with grey eyes and blood-red complexion; the mate of insolence and pride, shag-eared and deaf, hardly yielding to whip and spur.”

The inmortal, white horse, on the other hand, is noble and game, “upright and cleanly made… his color is white, and his eyes dark; he is a lover of honor and modesty and temperance, and the follower of true glory; he needs no touch of the whip, but is guided by word and admonition only.”

→In the driver’s seat is the charioteer, tasked with reining in these disparate steeds, guiding and harnessing them to propel the vehicle with strength and efficiency. The charioteer’s destination is the ridge of heaven, beyond which he may behold the Forms, Truth and absolute Knowledge. These essences nourish the horses’ wings, keeping the chariot in flight.

The charioteer joins a procession of gods, led by Zeus, on this trip into the heavens.

The ride is turbulent. The white horse wishes to rise, but the dark horse attempts to pull the chariot back towards the earth. As the horses pull in opposing directions, and the charioteer attempts to get them into sync, his chariot bobs above the ridge of heaven .

If the charioteer is able to behold the Forms, he gets to go on another revolution around the heavens. But if he cannot successfully pilot the chariot, the horses’ wings wither from lack of nourishment, or break off when the horses collide and attack each other, or crash into the chariots of others.

 When the chariot plummets to earth, the horses lose their wings, and the soul becomes embodied in human flesh. The degree to which the soul falls, and the “rank” of the mortal being it must then be embodied in is based on the amount of Truth it beheld while in the heavens.

The degree of the fall also determines how long it takes for the horses to regrow their wings and once again take flight. Basically, the more Truth the charioteer beheld on his journey, the shallower his fall, and the easier it is for him to get up and get going again.

 ________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda20

pl35

guarda20

________________________________________________________________________________________

The Tripartite Nature of the Soul and the Allegory of the Chariot

 Plato conceives of the soul as having (at least) three parts:

  1. A rational part (the part that loves truth and knowledge, which should rule over the other parts of the soul through the use of reason)→ The Charioteer represents man’s Reason
  2. A spirited part (which seeks glory, honor, recognition and victory) →The white horse represents man’s spirit (thymos:θύμος).
  3. An appetitive part (which desires food, drink, material wealth and sex) →The black horse represents man’s appetites.

Worth noting: In the dialogue “The Republic”, Plato states that justice will be that condition of the soul in which each of these three parts “does its own work,” and does not interfere in the workings of the other parts (Check out this post: “Plato’s “The Republic”: “On the Concept of  Justice”).

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

pl7

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Plato’s “Phaedrus”:

Click on the image above to read the dialogue "Phaedrus" by Plato.-

Click on the image above to read the dialogue “Phaedrus” by Plato.-

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Slideshare: Plato’s “Phaedrus”: “The Allegory of the Chariot and The Tripartite Nature of the Soul”:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Links Post:
http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ancient-soul/#3.2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chariot_Allegory
http://outre-monde.com/2010/09/27/platos-metaphors-the-chariot-allegory/
http://www.english.hawaii.edu/criticalink/plato/guide6.html
http://www.john-uebersax.com/plato/plato3.htm
http://www.scandalon.co.uk/philosophy/plato_tripartite_soul.htm

__________________________________________________________________________________________

cave13
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

_biblio.bing_

A law student and an avid reader. Along with your desired book reviews you're gonna get great book suggestions. Books of all genre with detailed review. Thank you, Visit Again ❤️

Welcome to akuner

People who love to eat & travel are always good people!

Viața

O zi minunată!

CapKane

thoughts on social realities

Reality Decoded

Making Clear What Is Hidden In Plain Sight

Șoapte în amurg

Șoaptele sufletului meu

daksh choudhary

daksh choudhary

Motivation Tools

A blog which offers articles books about successful people their strategies.

Dalla Stella alla Terra

Contatti con esseri senza tempo

C O F F E E TIME

Your Day News Blog

girosblog

Anche se vieni dagli altri ferito nulla ti serve legartela al dito perché sovente chi umilia di più vorrebbe avere le cose che hai tu!!!!

meri dairy

act out

polmeetsworld

Places that I visited

Neverending Stories Quotes

Feelings that i blend became the story which has no end

The Catalyst

Moving forward to a greener and cleaner earth through sustainable development

%d bloggers like this: