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Posts Tagged ‘“La Poesía No Muerde”’

►“Antigone” by Sophocles / Two Poems at “La Poesía no Muerde” / #BloggersBash Awards 🔆.-

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“Antigone” by Frederic Lord Leighton (1882)

“Antigone” by Frederic Lord Leighton (1882)

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Background and Summary:
Sophocles (497/6 – 406/5 BCE).

Sophocles (497/6 – 406/5 BCE).

“Antigone” is the third of the three Sophocles´ Theban plays but was the first written, chronologically. 

In fact, although “Antigone” deals with the events that happen chronologically last in the myth, the play was produced 15 years before “Oedipus Rex” and 36 years before “Oedipus at Colonus”.
“Antigone” picks up in the same place that “Oedipus at Colonus” leaves off.

Oedipus has just passed away in Colonus, and, after Oedipus´ death Antigone and her sister Ismene decide to return to Thebes.

After her father went into exile, Antigone and her sister were raised in the house of Creon.

Antigone´s brothers Polyneices and Eteocles were casualties in a brutal war for power, each brother dying by the other’s hand.

During Oedipus´s exile, the Teban  throne was shared by Polynices and Eteocles.

The two brothers decided to rule in an alternating fashion every year; but when it was time for Eteocles to step down, instead he expelled Polynices and kept the throne for himself.
Polynices, enraged, gathered an army and marched against Thebes, a story that is known as the Seven against Thebes.

During that battle, the attackers were repelled; the two brothers ended up in single combat, and killed each other.

After their death, their uncle Creon declared that Eteocles will be honored with burial since he was a defender of Thebes, while Polyneices’ body is left to the vultures and dogs. It is this edict that drives Antigone to defy the state, since she believes her brother Polyneices deserves the same treatment as Eteocles.

In the opening of the play, Antigone brings Ismene outside the palace gates late at night for a secret meeting: Antigone wants to bury Polyneices’ body, in defiance of Creon’s edict. Ismene refuses to help her, fearing the death penalty, but she is unable to stop Antigone from going to bury her brother herself, causing Antigone to disown her out of anger.

Creon, furious at the disobedience, questions Antigone over her actions, but she does not deny what she has done and argues with Creon about the morality of his edict and the morality of her deeds. Despite her innocence, Ismene is also interrogated and tries to confess falsely to the crime, wishing to die alongside her sister, but Antigone insists on shouldering full responsibility.
Enraged by Antigone’s refusal to submit to his authority, Creon declares that she and her sister will be put to death.

Creon decides to spare Ismene but rules that Antigone should be buried alive in a cave as punishment for her transgressions. She is brought out of the house, bewailing her fate but still vigorously defending her actions, and is taken away to her living tomb, to expressions of great sorrow by the Chorus.

Haemon, Creon’s son who was to marry Antigone, advises his father to reconsider his decision.

In a dramatic dialogue with his father, Haemon defends the moral basis of Antigone’s actions while warning his father that the people of Thebes sympathize with her determination to bury Polyneices.

The blind prophet Tiresias warns Creon warns Creon that the gods side with Antigone, and that Creon will lose a child for his crimes of leaving Polyneices unburied and for punishing Antigone so harshly. Tiresias warns that all of Greece will despise him, and that the sacrificial offerings of Thebes will not be accepted by the gods.

Creon insults Tiresias, but soon after he realizes that Tiresias has never been wrong and that he must do his bidding. Hence he eventually consents to follow their advice and to free Antigone and to bury Polyneices.

But, a messenger then enters to report that, in their desperation, both Haemon and Antigone have taken their own lives. Creon’s wife, Eurydice, is distraught with grief over the loss of her son, and flees the scene. Creon himself begins to understand that his own actions have caused these events. A second messenger then brings the news that Eurydice has also killed herself, calling curses down on Creon for having caused the tragedy.and, with her last breath, had cursed her husband and his intransigence.

Alone, in despair, Creon accepts responsibility for all the tragedy and prays for a quick death. The Chorus closes the play with an attempt at consolation, by saying that although the gods punish the proud, punishment also brings wisdom.

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Family Tree:

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♠Description of the Family Tree (Elements of the plot included):

Oedipus is a descendent of the Labdacus family. He inadvertently kills his father Laius and marries his mother, Jocasta.
As a result of Oedipus’ marriage to Jocasta, he sires four children, who are at once his siblings and his children: Eteocles, Polyneices, Ismene, and Antigone.

Oedipus, shamed by his marriage and murder, surrenders the kingdom to his brother Creon.

Creon takes over the kingdom because it is feared that Eteocles and Polyneices are also cursed by the Labdacus plague and will continue bringing misery to Thebes.

However, Polyneices makes a claim on the Theban crown, causing him to be banished. At this point, Polyneices raises an army, returns to claim Thebes, and ends up dying at the hands of Eteocles, who dies in the fray as well.

Creon remains in control of Thebes.

Of this line, only Ismene and Antigone remain living at the start of the play.

Antigone is supposed to marry her cousin Haemon, but by the end of the play, in a revelation that demonstrates just how widespread the Labdacus curse is – Haemon, Eurydice (Haemon´s mother) and Antigone die, leaving only Ismene and Creon as descendants of Labdacus.

Dichotomous Characters:

→Antigone / Creon:

The idealistic character of Antigone consciously risks her life through her actions, concerned only with obeying the laws of the gods and the dictates of familial loyalty and social decency. Creon, on the other hand, regards only the requirement of political expediency and physical power, although he too is unrelenting in his stance. Much of the tragedy lies in the fact that Creon’s realization of his folly and rashness comes too late, and he pays a heavy price, left alone in his wretchedness.

Creon abuses his power, mainly by decreeing man’s law as a consequence of divine will. He is  loyal to the state, but is subject to human weakness and poor judgment. He has Polyneices’ body defiled while Eteocles is honored because he feels that he cannot give equal to share to both brothers when one was a traitor and the other was loyal. He does not recognize that other forms of justice exist, and in his pride he condemns Antigone, defies the gods, and brings ruin on himself.

→Antigone / Ismene:

When faced with injustice, Antigone and Ismene react quite differently – the former aggressively, progressively, and the latter more conservatively. Ismene is not so much afraid of injustice as she is frightened of her own demise – and she cannot bear to incur the wrath of men for fear of being condemned to the same fate as the rest of her family. After watching her father and brothers die, she believes that the best course of action is to lie low and obey. In the case of Ismene, it seems inaction is tied to fear-at least until she willingly offers to die next to Antigone, at which point we realize that she is not so much inactive as she is unsure of her place as a woman. Thus, while Ismene is a figure characterized principally by doubt, Antigone is one who plunges ahead purely on self-belief and her firm convictions about right and wrong. Ultimately, then, because of these fundamental differences in philosophy, they cannot die together, though Ismene wants to. Antigone forbids it.

►Most Important Themes:

The play explores many deep themes such as state control (the right of the individual to reject society’s infringement on personal freedoms and obligations); natural law vs. Human law (Creon advocates obedience to Human laws, while Antigone stresses the higher laws of duty to the gods and one’s family) and the related issue of civil disobedience (Antigone believes that state law is not absolute, and that civil disobedience is justified in extreme cases); citizenship (Creon’s decree that Polyneices should remain unburied suggests that Polyneices’ treason in attacking the city effectively revokes his citizenship and the rights that go with it – ”citizenship by law” rather than “citizenship by nature”); and family (for Antigone, the honour of the family outweighs her duties to the state).

Quotes from Sophocles´s “Antigone”:

“All men make mistakes, but a good man yields when he knows his course is wrong, and repairs the evil. The only crime is pride”∼

“Tomorrow is tomorrow.
Future cares have future cures,
And we must mind today”.

“That will come when it comes;
we must deal with all that lies before us.
The future rests with the ones who tend the future.”

“To err is common
To all men, but the man who having erred
Hugs not his errors, but repents and seeks
The cure, is not a wastrel nor unwise”.

“All men make mistakes, it is only human.
But once the wrong is done, a man
can turn his back on folly, misfortune too,
if he tries to make amends, however low he’s fallen,
and stops his bullnecked ways. Stubbornness
brands you for stupidity—pride is a crime”.

“I was born to join in love, not hate–that is my nature”.

“Do not fear for me. Make straight your own path to destiny”.

“Unnatural silence signifies no good”.

“Mad are thy subjects all, and even the wisest heart
Straight to folly will fall, at a touch of thy poisoned dart”.

“Wisdom is the supreme part of happiness; and reverence towards the Gods must be inviolate. Great words of prideful men are ever punished with great blows, and, in old age, teach the chastened to be wise”.

“Oh, it’s terrible when the one who does the judging judges things all wrong”.

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"Antigone" by Sophocles. Click on the image to read the play.

“Antigone” by Sophocles. Click on the image to read the play.

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Links Post:
http://www.gradesaver.com/antigone
http://www.varsitytutors.com/englishteacher/antigone-lesson-plans.html
http://www.sparknotes.com/drama/antigone/summary.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antigone_(Sophocles_play)
http://www.greekmythology.com/Myths/Mortals/Polynices/polynices.html
http://www.gradesaver.com/antigone/study-guide/summary
http://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/o/the-oedipus-trilogy/play-summary/antigone

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►  “My Poems Inmersión / Immersion and Quien calla otorga / Silence means consent at La Poesía no Muerde”.

[May 4th/May 12th 2016].~

I am glad to announce that my poems “Immersion” and “Silence means consent” were featured at “La Poesía no Muerde”

In both cases, the prompt was to write a poem based on images and songs.

•The song corresponding to the first poem is  “Alanna” and it was composed by Orlando Valle. 

As to its image, it comes from Bernardo Arcos, whose blog´s name is “La cueva de Don Bernardo”. Plus, You can check out the Youtube Video, in which I read the poem here

•The song for “Silence means consent” is “Reunión Bleue”, by Orlando Valle Several photographs by Marcos Ferreiro illustrate the poem. You can check out the Youtube Video, in which I read the poem here.

As you may know by now, “La Poesía no Muerde” is a blog hosted by Hélène Laurent.

It is a collective blog in Spanish which prompts are usually triggered by images that might lead to poems or poems that, once published, are waiting to be illustrated with images. In this case, music was a new component.

The two poems I wrote were included in this post and over here

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►La Poesía no Muerde  

~ Poem~ “Inmersión” / “Immersion”:

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inmersion

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immersion

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►“Inmersión” (Cuarta Experiencia “La Poesía no Muerde”):

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►La Poesía no Muerde / Poetry doesn´t Bite 

~ Poem~ “Quien calla otorga” / “Silence means consent”:

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quien calla otorga

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silence means consent

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 🌟Last but surely not least 🌟:

→Bloggers Bash Awards: “Most informative Blog Award”:

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Annual Blogger Bash 2016. (Logo from Sacha Black´s blog ©)

So guys, have you read about the Annual Blogger’s Bash… In case you haven´t, it is an annual blogger meeting which takes place in London… This year, it was set up for June 11th.

The Bash was organised by the committee members: Sacha, Ali, Hugh, and Geoff.

As Sacha says: “It’s purpose is to bring together the blogging community and provide an opportunity for everyone to meet the friends they have

made online”.

Well, apparently they had a blast. There was a welcome speech; bloggers social gathering; the Annual Bloggers Bash awards given out at

intervals. And… the event included an informative masterclass from Luca Sartoni, international speaker and member of Automatic,  WordPress. 

During the event, the attendees knew first-hand who were the Bloggers Bash Awards´winners. Soon later, the one and only Sacha posted the complete list on her blog. 

This is the personal side of the issue: I am very happy to announce that I won the Bloggers Bash Award for Most informative Blog!You can watch this little clip from the Bash, in which Geoff announced I had won Most Informative Blog… Thanks to everyone who voted for me. Also, congratulations to all the nominees, and to the Bash committee  for organizing these awards and the event!.

Head over to Sacha Black´s blog to check out the complete list. 😉☀️ Also, check out the Bloggers Bash  Facebook group and Twitter hashtag.

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Most Informative Blogger Award. Thanks to everyone who voted for me !. (Screenshot from Sacha Black´s blog ©)

Most Informative Blog Award. Thanks to everyone who voted for me!…(Screenshot from Sacha Black´s blog ©)

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Most Informative Blogger Award.

🌟Most Informative Blog Award🌟.

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Note: In order to write this overview on the Annual Blogger’s Bash, I read and used information contained in the following posts/blogs (Credits go to the respective owners).

♠”Annual Bloggers Bash” by Sacha Black.

♠”Bloggers Bash, The Ultimate Faq” by Sacha Black.

♠”And the winners of the #bloggerbash awards 2016 are”… by Sacha Black.

♠”The #BloggersBash Agenda and Who’s Who” by Ali Isaac.

♠”How to ensure your perfect ABB (Annual Bloggers Bash) #bloggersbash” by Geoff Le Pard.

♠”The Annual Bloggers Bash Awards – Voting Has Now Closed” by Hugh Roberts.

♠”A picture is worth a thousand words #mondayblogs #bloggersbash” by Shelley Wilson.

♠”A Blogging Great Day!” by Judy Martin at Edwina Episodes.

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Helene Laurent 00

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Helene Laurent I

Hélène Laurent.-

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►About  Hélène Laurent:

Word Lover inhabited by images. Specialist in Arts Performance. Founder and manager of “La Poesía no muerde”/”Poetry does not bite,” art community that promotes  collective poetry and the creative exchange from, different aesthetic approaches and sensibilities. Amateur photographer. She took part in the collective publications “Poetry in the distance” (“At your encounter” and “In the end, poetry) alongside other spanish poets. She was second runner-up in the Social Poetry Award of León, and runner-up in the contestant “On what happens between verses” and “A poem in eighty days”, during 2015.

►Sobre Hélène Laurent:

Amante de la palabra habitada por imágenes. Especialista en Artes Escénicas. Fundadora y administradora de “La Poesía no muerde”, comunidad artística que promueve la creación conjunta y el intercambio creativo desde especialidades, estéticas y sensibilidades distintas. Aficionada a la fotografía. Participó en las publicaciones colectivas “Poesía en la distancia” (“A tu encuentro” y “Al final, poesía), con poetas del panorama nacional. Segunda finalista del premio de poesía social de León, finalista de los concursos “De lo que pasa entre versos” y “Un poema en ochenta días”, durante 2015.

 •Hélène Laurent dixit:

Before calling myself an artist I´d rather say that I have certain weakness towards people… I can not avoid watching and analysing from the distance, trying to put myself in someone else´s shoes to make this stranger appear as a new world, ready to explore, or, even to invent. A world of thoughts, feelings and experiences, which-whether shared or not- might end giving birth to a poem, an image, a calligram, or even a theatrical character. I feel that Art is a never-ending and bidirectional trip between the individual and the universal… That Beauty is placed both in what puts us and in what pulls us apart. And, that, at times, while traveling the path, a “You” is needed in order to teach out a deeper “I”.

 Hélène Laurent dixit:

Antes que artista me considero “Apasionada por la humanidad”, tengo cierta debilidad por las personas, no puedo evitar observar y analizar en la distancia, intentar situarme un instante bajo la piel de otro y que este anónimo se convierta en un nuevo mundo que explorar o inventar, un mundo de pensamientos, sentimientos y vivencias, compartidas o no, que puede acabar cobrando vida a través de un poema, una imagen, un caligrama, o incluso un personaje teatral. Siento que el Arte no deja de ser un viaje constante y bidireccional entre el individuo y lo universal… Que la belleza se sitúa tanto en lo que nos une, como en lo que nos separa y que, a veces, hace falta un “tú” en el camino para llegar a un “yo” más profundo.

►About “La Poesía no Muerde”:

“La Poesía no Muerde” is a poetry blog hosted by Hélène Laurent. It is a collective blog in spanish which prompts are usually triggered by images that might lead to poems, or poems that -once published- are waiting to be illustrated with photographs or creative images, such as collages or digital artworks, provided by readers.

Feel free to follow and connect with “La Poesía no Muerde” on FacebookTwitter, YouTube and Google Plus.

NOTE. If you would like to be part of “La Poesía no Muerde” and collaborate by writing a poem, triggered by an image... And/or if you are just curious about how your poem in English might look in Spanish, you can contact me over here… I will do my best to help you with a good translation. 

►Sobre “La Poesía no Muerde”:

Es un blog dirigido por coordinado por Hélène. Es un sitio colectivo en castellano, cuyas consignas son generalmente llegar a poemas a través de imágenes disparadoras o ilustrar poemas que, unas vez publicados, esperan ser ilustrados con fotografías u otras variantes creativas, como ser collages o creaciones digitales, provistas siempre  por los lectores.

Puedes conectar con “La Poesía no Muerde” en FacebookTwitter, YouTube and Google Plus.

►About the book DESenREdo:

Desenredo is the latest book by  Hélène Laurent y Julia Moral. It could be defined as a fusion of poetry, photography and drawing.  A peculiar way of honoring the comic.

The book is an invitation to return to the essences, to play with words and images, both through love and humour… It calls us to seize everything, to enjoy both the knots and the disentanglements.

★ My opinion: I have had the chance to read the book and truly enjoyed it. The poems reflect emotions with which we may immediately relate to. Besides, the illustrations, in comic-shape, give the poems an interesting interpretative twist. I recommend it.

DESenREdo is available in Spanish, Spanish/English and Spanish/French. The available formats are Hard Copy and PDF. You can purchase the book here.

You can also visit the namesake blog here. Finally, you can check out the virtual Store here.

►Sobre el libroDESenREdo, por Hélène Laurent and Julia Moral:

Es el reciente libro de Fusión de poesía, fotografía y dibujo en un peculiar homenaje al cómic. DESenREdo es una invitación a volver a la esencia, a jugar con la palabra y la imagen con mucho amor o mucho humor… a no desperdiciar nada y a disfrutar tanto de los nudos, como de los DESnudos. El libro cuenta con imágenes e ilustraciones de Julia Moral, alias Desmoral.

★ Mi opinión: He tenido la oportunidad de leer el libro y realmente me ha gustado. Los poemas reflejan emociones con las cuales inmediatamente nos identificamos. Además, las ilustraciones en formato comic le dan a los poemas un interesante giro interpretativo. Lo recomiendo. 

DESenREdoestá disponible en tres idiomas, a saber Castellano, Inglés y Francés. Puedes adquirir el libro aquí.

También puedes visitar el blog homónimo aquí. E incluso la tienda DESenREdo aquí

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DESenREdo.

DESenREdo, Book/Libro. Click above to check it out / Click en el logo para consultar.~

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DESenREdo Blog

DESenREdo, Blog. Click above to visit/ Click en el logo para ingresar.~

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Hélène Laurent.-

Hélène Laurent.-

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Poems Desenredo

💫“France Aches”  / “Me Duele la Francia” / “Mal à la France” 💫:

►My insights on “France Aches”:

This poem, “France Aches”, by Hélène Laurent absolutely reached me.

It depicts with an existentialist tone, the succeeding feelings raised by the terrorist attacks which took place in Paris, France, during November 2015.  These sad events threw down at least 128 killed in gunfire and blasts.
Given this background, Hélène describes her feelings, which seem to set up in oddness and absorbed incomprehension.
The second and third stanzas come up with National characters, such as the French 
Enlightenment philosophers
from the 18th century and `Marianne´, a name which alludes to the French right wing, conservative politician Marine Le Pen. Not to mention other icons, such as the cock, which is France’s National emblema.

Hélène also makes reference to a flag with a single colour, which we assume would be black, representing grief following the awful incidents.

The poem is presented written in English and Spanish. And in video shape, in English, Spanish and French.

As to the videos, the versions in Spanish and French are both read by Hélène. The reading for the English version is mine. 

•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•

►Mis reflexiones Sobre “Me Duele la Francia”:

Este poema “Me Duele la Francia” realmente me conmovió. 

Retrata, con un tono existencialista, los sentimientos  siguientes suscitados tras los los ataques terroristas que tuvieron lugar en París, Francia, durante Noviembre de 2015. Estos tristes incidentes arrojaron como saldo al menos 128 muertos en tiroteos y explosiones.

Dado este contexto Hélène describe sus sentimientos, que parecen situarse  en la incomprensión.

En la segunda y la tercera estrofa del poema aparecen personajes nacionales, como los Filósofos de la Ilustración del siglo XVIII Y `Marianne´, nombre que alude a la política francesa de derecha Marine Le Pen. Sin mencionar otros íconos, como el gallo, que es el Emblema Nacional Francés. 

Hélène también hace referencia a una bandera con un solo color, el cual asumimos sería el negro, representando el duelo que sobreviene a los terribles incidentes.

El poema es presentado en forma escrita, en Inglés y Castellano. Y, en formato de video, en Inglés, Castellano y Francés.

Respecto a los videos, las versiones en Castellano y Francés son ambas leídas por Hélène. La lectura para la versión en Inglés es mía.

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France Aches

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💫“France Aches”💫. English 🇬🇧.

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►“Me duele la Francia”. Castellano 🇪🇸.

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Me Duele la Francia, screenshot. DesenRedo

Me Duele la Francia, screenshot. DesenRedo

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►“Mal à la France”. Français 🇫🇷.

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►“En la Puerta del Cielo” / “At Heaven´s Door”:

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En la puerta del cielo

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heaven s door

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en-la-puerta-del-cielo

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“Otros Poemas” / “Other Poems”:

(Spanish/English. Castellano/Inglés)

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JAULA ABIERTA

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OPEN CAGE

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marioneta

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puppet

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►Gallería/ Gallery

►Aforismos, por Hélène Laurent / Aphorisms by Hélène Laurent:

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Links Post:
http://lapoesianomuerde.com/category/el-rincon-de-helene/
http://lapoesianomuerde.com/2015/09/21/presentacion-de-desenredo-libro/
http://lapoesianomuerde.com/2015/12/10/la-mordida-de-susana-resena-desenredo/
https://desenredopoesia.wordpress.com/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/November_2015_Paris_attacks
http://lapoesianomuerde.com/2013/09/11/en-la-puerta-del-cielo/
https://desenredopoesia.wordpress.com/2015/12/07/me-duele-la-francia-mal-a-la-france-videopoemas/
https://desenredopoesia.wordpress.com/2015/10/19/marionetamarionette-desenredo/
http://lapoesianomuerde.com/2015/12/19/aforismos/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDfBf2uWEqmzMKLoKb6oSEg

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hermes0

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“Mercury” by Evelyn De Morgan. 1873

“Mercury” by Evelyn De Morgan. 1873.

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(Roman name: Mercury) was the messenger of the Gods.

It was Hermes´duty to guide the souls of the dead down to the underworld, which is known as a psycho pomp.

Carl Jung often speaks of Hermes as psycho pomp, spiritual friend, or personal guide.

He says: “From the earliest times, Hermes was the psycho pomp of the alchemists, their friend and counselor, who leads them to the goal of their work. He is like a teacher mediating between the stone and the disciple… To others the friend appears in the shape of Christ or Khidr or a visible or invisible guru, or some other personal guide or leader figure”. (Carl Jung, Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious. 1934–1954. Vol.9 Part 1. CW 9I, para. 283).

One of his most famous regular roles was as as God of Crossroads, leader of souls to the river Styx in the underworld, where the boatman Charon would take them to Hades.

He was also portrayed as an emissary and messenger of the gods: an intercessor between mortals and the divine, and conductor of souls into the afterlife. He has been viewed as the protector and patron of herdsmen, thieves, oratory and wit, literature and poetry, athletics and sports, invention and trade for being cunning and full of tricks.

He was also the patron of of luck and revered by gamblers and merchants undertaking new enterprises.

hermes05Hermes was son of Zeus and one of the Pleiades, Maia

He was born in a cave on Mount Cyllene in Arcadia. Zeus had impregnated Maia at the dead of night while all other gods slept. When dawn broke amazingly he was born.

Maia wrapped him in swaddling bands, then resting herself, fell fast asleep. Hermes, however, squirmed free and ran off to Thessaly.

This is where Apollo, his brother, grazed his cattle. Hermes stole a number of the herd and drove them back to Greece. He hid them in a small grotto near to the city of Pylos and covered their tracks.

Before returning to the cave he caught a tortoise, killed it and removed its entrails. Using the intestines from a cow stolen from Apollo and the hollow tortoise shell, he made the first lyre.

When he reached the cave he wrapped himself back into the swaddling bands.

When Apollo realized he had been robbed he protested to Maia that it had been Hermes who had taken his cattle. Maia looked to Hermes and said it could not be, as he is still wrapped in swaddling bands. Zeus the all powerful intervened saying he had been watching and Hermes should return the cattle to Apollo. As the argument went on, Hermes began to play his lyre.

The sweet music enchanted Apollo, and he offered Hermes to keep the cattle in exchange for the lyre. Apollo later became the grand master of the instrument, and it also became one of his symbols.

Hermes was also known as something of a trickster, stealing at one time or another Poseidon’s trident, Artemis’ arrows, and Aphrodites girdle.

Hermes appears in Homer´s  Iliad. He is most often described by Homer as ‘Hermes the guide, slayer of Argos’ and ‘Hermes the kindly’.

In Homer´s Odyssey, Hermes helps Odysseus, especially on his long return voyage to Ithaca. 

Another hero helped by the god was Perseus. Hermes gave him an unbreakable sword and guided him to were the Gorgon Medusa was.

Hermes is usually depicted with a broad-brimmed hat or a winged cap, winged sandals and the heralds staff (kerykeion in Greek, or Caduceus in Latin).

He was often shown as a shaft with two white ribbons, although later they were represented by serpents intertwined in a figure of eight shape, and the shaft often had wings attached.

Symbols of Hermes were the turtle, the stork, the rooster, the goat, the number four.

Originally Hermes was a phallic god, being attached to fertility and good fortune, and also a patron of roads and boundaries.  It is also possible that since the beginning he has been a deity with shamanic attributes linked to divination, reconciliation,magic, sacrifices, and initiation and contact with other planes of existence, a role of mediator between the worlds of the visible and invisible.

As to Hermes Trismegistus, he may be a representation of the syncretic combination of the Greek god Hermes and the Egyptian god Thoth

In Hellenistic Egypt, the Greeks recognised the congruence of their god Hermes with Thoth, egyptian God of Knowledge. 

Hence, the two gods were worshipped as one in what had been the Temple of Thoth in Khemnu, which the Greeks called Hermopolis.

There is still another Egyptian parallel, specifically, in the figure of Anubis. In classical mythology, Hermanubis was a god who combined Hermes with Anubis. Hermes and Anubis’s similar responsibilities (they were both conductors of souls) led to the god Hermanubis.

Icons of Hermes were displayed in front of houses and where roads intersect. He was seen as guiding people in transition.

Hermes was worshiped throughout Greece, especially in Arcadia, and festivals in his honor were called Hermoea. 

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On the Left: “Parnaso” by Andrea Mantegna, 1497. On the Right: Detail Hermes and Pegasus.

On the Left: “Parnaso” by Andrea Mantegna, 1497. On the Right: Detail Hermes and Pegasus.

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►Galleries: “Hermes, the Messenger of Gods”:

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Links Post:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermes
http://www.ancient.eu/Hermes/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermes_Trismegistus
http://www.mythweb.com/encyc/entries/hermes.html
http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Hermes

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lpnm3

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

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► “My Poem Tempus Fugit at La Poesía no Muerde” 

[December 10th, 2015].~

I am very glad to tell my readers that my poem “Tempus Fugit” has been featured at “La Poesía no Muerde”. I initially wrote the poem in Spanish, based in an image called “Il tempo che passa e il tempo che resiste”provided by Angela Caporaso (Caserta – Italy) so I am attaching the image, the poem in Spanish and its translation to English…

“La Poesía no Muerde” is a blog hosted by Hélène Laurent. It is a collective blog in spanish which prompts are usually triggered by images that might lead to poems or poems that once published are waiting to be illustrated with photographs or creative images, such as collages or digital creations… With that being said, I hope that you take a peek and subscribe if you enjoy it, which I am sure you will…

As to the poem I was making reference to, you can check out the original post here. It is also included in La Poesía no Muerde, fourth literary magazine, page 42.

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►La Poesía no Muerde / Poetry doesn´t Bite

~ Poem~“Tempus Fugit”:

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tempus fugit

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tempus fugit english

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►Last but not Least: Four Awards:

AWARDS

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Thank you very much to Millie Thom from the namesake blog, Irena from Books and Hot Tea,  Yemie from Straight from the Heart and Luis López from ByLuis7 for nominating me for an Epic Awesomeness Award, a Dragon’s Loyalty Award a Sisterhood Of The World Bloggers Award and a Bloguera con Buen Rollo Award, respectively… Please make sure to check out these blogs and follow them, if you haven´t already done so… 

*Note*: If you have been nominated, check out the four awards which are displayed at the end. Click on the respective logo to save it.

♠Rules for the Epic Awesomeness Award:

•Display the award on your blog.
•Announce your win with a post and link the blogger who nominated you.
•Present at least 7 deserving bloggers with the award.
•Link your awardees in the post.
•Write about the indirect questions above… just let it flow… 

Question 1→You are awesome; tell us why… what does awesome mean to you?… 

Awesome… I guess it means extremely good… But, on the other hand, the Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines it as and adjective, which implies that something or someone causes feelings of fear and wonder: causing feelings of awe. 

I was think of Immanuel Kant… In his book, “Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime” (1764),  Immanuel Kant describes the feeling of the sublime and the feeling of the beautiful.

Some of his examples of feelings of the beautiful are the sight of flower beds, grazing flocks, and daylight.  

As to Kant, they “occasion a pleasant sensation but one that is joyous and smiling”. 

Feelings of the sublime are the result of seeing mountain peaks, raging storms, and night. These ones, according to Kant, “arouse enjoyment but with horror”. Kant said that Beauty and the Sublime can be joined or alternated…

So, I am that “awesomeness” could be a sort of dual feeling at times… Isn’t idealization or admiration a sort of sublimation?. … Don´t we experience a sort of shivering dizziness when we come across something/someone awesome after all?.

Question 2→You are my friend; tell us about other blogger friends …

I have met extraordinary bloggers and I felt a sort of deep connection with many of them… Even when Virtuality would seem a veiled reality, at times… I´d rather call it an alternative Reality, at least, using as measurement parameter, our Reality … I find so many beautiful posts, I learn every single day something new due to my blogger friends… For the record, I am now thinking that Twitter is also a great tool. I believe that it is a very efficient way to catch up with blogs you really like and to do so almost daily…

My seven nominees for the Epic Awesomeness Award are: 1. Jeri Walker #Editor 2. Life as we See It 3. Straight from the Heart 4. House of Heart 5. A Chaos Fairy Realm 6 Books and Hot Tea 7. A Writer’s Path.

 

♠Rules for the Dragon’s Loyalty Award:

•Display the award on your blog.
•Announce your win with a post and link the blogger who nominated you.
•Present 6 deserving bloggers with the award.
•Link your awardees in the post.
•Write 7 things about you.

→The 7 facts about me are… 

 1. I am a scorpion in the horoscope and was born one day before my mom, but, needless to say, a few decades after her… 2. I’m very superstitious. 3. I am extremely cynical when arguing with someone… I usually know how to leave my opponent speechless… 4. I love cats, I not only speak to them, but I speak with them 5. I hate ignorance by conviction 6. Once I´ve started a series on Netflix I enjoy, I seldom set it aside before having completely finished it. 7.  I believe in God, despite my rational faith in the Theory of Evolution.

My six nominees for the Dragon’s Loyalty Award are: 1. Shehanne Moore 2. ByLuis7 3. Scribble and Scrawl  4Millie Thom 5. Micheline’s Blog 6. Scattered Thoughts

♠Rules for the Sisterhood Of The World Bloggers Award: 

•Display the award on your blog.
•Announce your win with a post and link the blogger who nominated you.
•Present at least 7 deserving bloggers with the award.
•Link your awardees in the post.
•Answer to the following questions below. 

1.What’s your life’s philosophy? I will mention three principles, concerning this question. a. Be tolerant… your opinion is just a personal, thus relative, standpoint. b. Be Patient. Try to get the whole picture, before jumping in… c. Give people the benefit of the doubt, until all doubts are vanished. 

2.One word that best describes you would be?… Steadfast. 

3.What’s the one best thing for you about being female, or if being the case male?… Honestly, I believe that women are more gracious and gorgeous, and our sexuality is an endless driving loop … Plus we don´t have to shave our faces each morning.

4.Who’s that one person, (could be your regular boy/girl next door or a celebrity crush or a pet or even a stuffed toy) you’d really fancy being marooned with for three whole days and nights on a deserted island and why?... I won´t put down details here regarding my personal life… To avoid awkwardness, I´ll carry the stuffed toy… *Successful deterrent maneuver*. 

5.What would you say was the craziest, nuttiest thing you’ve ever found yourself doing?… Any of the stuff I might do if I ever get more than I can take… *Free interpretation*.

My seven nominees for the Sisterhood Of The World Bloggers Award are:  1. Brittney Sahin 2. People Forward 3. Claudia Moss 4. Course of Mirrors 5. Tails Around the Ranch 6. Souldier Girl  7. The Genealogy of Style

♠Rules for the Bloguera con Buen Rollo Award: 

•Display the award on your blog.
•Announce your win with a post and link the blogger who nominated you.
•Present at least 6 deserving bloggers with the award.
•Link your awardees in the post.
•Answer to the following questions below.

1.How frequently do you post on your blog?. Once in three weeks or once a month… 

2. Was it hard for you to choose the name of your blog?. Not that much… I knew I wanted to include Athena, the Goddess of Wisdom and then the hero Achilles popped up… Aquileana is a sort of Hybrid resulting of their juxtaposition.

3. Please, recommend me a book to read and review. Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami. 

4. Please, recommend me a song. This Is The Life –and many others- by Amy Macdonald.

5. Which would be your recommendation regarding your blog?. Read it slowly and click on the red links, i.e trackbacks.

6. Do you share your posts on Social Media?. Yes, I do. On Twitter, Google Plus and Pinterest.

7. Which one would you say is your favorite character whether from movies, series or books… I would say that Lady Mary Crawley from the series Downtown Abbey. At least, lately…

My six nominees for the Bloguera con Buen Rollo Award are: 1. My Space in the Immense Universe 2. Postcards from Kerry 3. Travels with Choppy 4. Fatima Saysell 5. Sherrie Miranda 6. Lorna´s Voice.

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Merry Christmas from Aquileana

Merry Christmas, for all those who celebrate them, and Happy New Year, everyone 💛☀️. My next post will be exclusively a Guest Post… 

See you Soon, in 2016 💛. Much Joy and Love. Aquileana ☺️

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the centaurs

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“Centaur and Cupid” by Gustave Moreau. 19th century.

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The Centaurs were a tribe of half man, half horse savages which inhabited the mountains and forests of Magnesia. 

Another tribe of Centaurs resided in the western Peloponnese where they came into conflict with the hero Heracles.

The centaurs were usually said to have been born of Ixion and Nephele (the cloud made in the image of Hera, Zeus‘ Wife):

Ixion fell in love with Hera and tried to rape her, and when Hera told Zeus about it, Zeus wanted to determine if her report was really true. So he fashioned a cloud (nephele) to look like Hera, and laid it by Ixion’s side. When Ixion bragged that he had slept with Hera, Zeus punished him by tying him to a wheel, on which he was turned by winds up in the air. The cloud bore Kentauros (Centaurus) from Ixion’s seed. [Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca E1. 20 C2nd A.D.)].~

In the  earliest accounts, the centaurs appear merely as a sort of gigantic, savage, or animal-like beings; whereas, in later writers, they are described as monsters, with the upper body of a man, from head to loins, set upon the body of a horse.

Sometimes, they had the facial feature of a man, at other times they were portrayed with the snub nose and pointed ears of a rustic Satyr.

It is probably owing to the resemblance between the nature of the centaurs and that of the satyrs, that the former were in later times drawn into the sphere of Dionysiac beings; but here they appear no longer as savage monsters, but as tamed by the power of the god.

They are described as leading a rude and savage life, occasionally carrying off the women of their neighbours, as covered with hair and ranging over their mountains like animals. 

The Centaurs are best known for their fight against their cousins, The Lapith tribe, a legendary people of Greeks, whose home was in Thesaly. This fight was caused by the Centaurs’ attempt attempt to carry off  Princess Hippodamia and the rest of the Lapith women on the day of Hippodamia’s marriage to Pirithous, king of  Lapithae.

Pirithous and his friend, Theseus, led the Lapiths to victory over the Centaurs in a battle known as Centauromachy.

The kentauros had come to the Lapithai’s country, and now with wine he clouded his understanding and in his frenzy did monstrous things in the very hall of Peirithoos. The heroes were seized with indignation; they leapt up, they dragged the kentauros across the courtyard and out of doors, they lopped off his ears and nose with the ruthless bronze, and the frenzied creature went his way, taking his retribution with him in his still darkened mind. From this beginning came the long feud between men and Kentauroi (Centaurs) [Homer, Odyssey 21. 293 ff (Greek epic C8th B.C.)].~

The centaur is incorporated into the Zodiac sign for Sagittarius, with the bow and arrow, whose symbolism could be understood as a shamanic reference to mystic or visionary travel.

Centaurs are the antithesis of the knight and the horseman. Instead of mastering or taming their instincts, the centaurs are ruled by them. The exception is the wise Centaur Chiron.

Chiron’s mother was the nymph Philyra who was coupling with Cronos when his wife suddenly appeared on the scene. To escape notice he transformed himself into a horse, and in this way sired a half-equine son.

Chiron’s physical appearance often differs somewhat from other centaurs, demonstrating his status and heritage. In traditional Greek representations of Chiron his front legs are human, rather than equine, this is in contrast to the traditional representation of centaurs,which have the entire lower body of a horse. This clearly sets Chiron apart from the other centaurs, making him easily identifiable.

Besides, centaurs were notorious for being wild and lusty, overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, given to violence when intoxicated. Chiron, by contrast Chiron was notable throughout Greek mythology for his youth-nurturing nature. 

Myths in the Olympian tradition attributed Chiron’s uniquely peaceful character and intelligence to teaching by Apollo and his sister Artemis.

Chiron would also teach Apollo’s son, Asclepius, and Achilles, the best fighter of the Greeks besieging Troy in the Trojan War.

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“Walking Ride”, by Franz von Stuck (1903).

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“Pallas and Centaur” by Sandro Botticell (1482).

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Gallery: “The Centaurs”:

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►Links Post:
http://www.ancient.eu/centaur/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centaur
http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/KentauroiThessalioi.html
http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/KentaurosKheiron.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippodamia_(wife_of_Pirithous)

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lpnm3

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

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►”My Audio Poem at La Poesía no Muerde”:

~”Tiempo Perpetuo”/ “Perpetual Time”. [July 14th, 2015].~

In this occasion, my poem “Perpetual Time” has been featured at “La Poesía no Muerde”. I both wrote and read the poem. The video poem was created by Hélène Laurent. Check out the original post here.

En este caso, mi poema “Tiempo Perpetuo” ha sido publicado en “La Poesía no Muerde”. Se trata de un poema con audio, leído y escrito por mí. El video fue creado por Hélène Laurent. Consultar el post orginal aquí.

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►La Poesía no Muerde~Audio Poem ~

“Tiempo Perpetuo”  / “Perpetual Time” 

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~Perpetual Time~
 
And now …
Where do our memories remain,
those dark splendors?
These barren wastelands were springs
and blue rains,
fruitful outdoors;
Now just grooves of Time … 
~~~  
Cracks of your footsteps.
Surreptitious hollows and shadows.
Unrelenting water flows,
like a river of time.
~~~ 
From a subterraneous mirror drops gurgling.
Your hand exchanging movements,
trapping me inside the storm that precedes any drought.
An hourglass, greedy, thirsty. 
 ~~~ 
And a thousand ships crossing the Lethe,
the salty river of forgetfulness .
Thirst and desire, outsider lighthouses.
All memory is dryness,
vague journey  from Present to Past. 
~~~ 
 Echo, repetition
[Echo] …
dissolved into nothing.
Your summer fertility
turns against me.
~~~
Crater of fire.
Unattainable …
Wind setback,
disintegrating summer abysses  
Beaches devastated by your flames
like a cup filled with ashes.
Legacy of a temporary fold …
Lost constellations.
—–
guarda01
© Amalia Pedemonte. 2015.~

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►Last but not Least: “Three Awards”:

I would like to thank  bloggers from 4 Years Old Adult, The Wall Gallery Blog and Ser un Ser de Luz for nominating my blog for a Brotherhood Award, a Creative Blogger Award and a Bor Litarcihis Award, respectively.

I suggest you to check out these blogs and follow them, if you haven’t still done so…

•Rules for the Brotherhood Award and Creative Blogger Award: ♠Thank the person who nominated you. ♠Add the logo to your post. ♠Nominate ten (10) bloggers of your choice and tell them about the nomination. 

•Notes:

-As always I am not answering questions. Hence, I will just nominate ten bloggers per award.

-If you have been nominated and want to follow the Nomination Process, just click on the award for which you have been nominated for. That way you’ll be able to grab in regular size!.~🍃 🍃🍃 ~

I. Nominees for the Brotherhood Award: 1. Mind Love Misery 2. Henry West 3. Truels 4 . BerlinArt2 5. Round World and Me 6. The Reading Bud 7. The Wall Gallery Blog 8. Ser un Ser de Luz 9. Kintal 10. Aqua Compass 7.

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II. Nominees for the Creative Blogger Award: 1. Tuesdays with Laurie 2. Voices from the Margins 3. Renne Johnson Writes 4 . Upchucking Words 5. Fiesta Estrella 6. Close to Eighty 7. Friendly Fairy Tales 8. Mieux Vivre Jardin 9. 4 Year Old Adult 10. Implied Spaces.

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III. Nominees for the Bor Litarcihis Award: I will follow Silvia´s rules in this case. And I will leave this Award open to all bloggers who want to pick it up and pass it on to other bloggers. 

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►Bonustrack. Some recent Photographs ….

Selfies and Evening Views. Buenos Aires

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asclepius

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“The Offering to Asclepius” by Pierre Narcisse Guerin (1803).

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“Gentle Asclepius, that craftsman of new health for weary limbs and banisher of pain, the godlike healer of all mortal sickness”.
[Pindar, Pythian Ode 3. 5 ff. C5th BC].

Asclepius (Roman equivalent: Aesculapius) was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis.

While Coronis was with Apollo, she became enamoured with Ischys, an Arcadian, and Apollo was informed of this by a raven, which he had set to watch her, or, according to Pindar, by his own prophetic powers.

Apollo sent his own sister, Artemis to kill Coronis. Presumably, Artemis destroyed Coronis in her own house at Lacereia in Thessaly.

According to Ovid, it was Apollo himself who killed Coronis and Ischys.

When the body of Coronis was to be burnt, Apollo, or, according to others Hermes, the messenger of the Gods, saved the child (Asclepius) cutting him from her womb.

From this fact, he received the name Asclepius, “to cut open”.

Apollo carried the baby to the Centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the Art of Medicine.

After Asclepius had grown up, it was said that he not only cured all the sick, but called the dead to life again. About the manner in which he acquired this latter power, according to Apollodorus, he had received from Athena the blood which had flowed from the veins of Gorgo and the blood which had flowed from the veins of the right side of her body possessed the power of restoring the dead to life. [Note~ Gorgo: One of three winged daemon, it should have been Medusa as she was the only mortal among them].

Asclepius was married to Epione, with whom he had five daughters: Hygieia, Panacea, Aceso, Iaso and Aglaea and three sons: Machaon, Podaleirios and Telesphoros

The names of his daughters each rather transparently reflect a certain subset of the overall theme of “good health”. 

Hygiea was the Goddess of Good Health and a companion of the goddess Aphrodite. Panacea was the Goddess of All-Cure. Iaso was the Goddess of Remedy. Aceso was the Goddess of healing and curing. And Aglaea was the Goddess of Natural Beauty.

Some accounts say that Asclepius was killed because after bringing people back from the dead, Hades thought that no more dead spirits would come to the underworld, so he asked his brother Zeus to stop him. Zeus did so, with a flash of lightning. 

“[Asclepius] a healer for mankind of all their maladies and ills . . . And yet to profit even the skills of wisdom yield themselves captive. For a lordly bribe, gold flashing in the hand, even this man [Asclepius] was tempted to bring back to life one whom the jaws of death had seized already. With fierce hands swiftly the son of Cronos [Zeus] loosed his anger on these two; his blazing bolt stripped from them both their breath of life, and hurled them to their fate”. (Pindar, Pythian Ode 3. 54. C5th BC).~

Asclepius’s father, Apollo was angered, so in return he killed the three Cyclopes, one-eyed inmortal Giants who had made the thunderbolts for Zeus.

For this act, Zeus suspended Apollo from the night sky and commanded Apollo to serve the King of Thessaly.

Once the year had passed, Zeus brought Apollo back to Mount Olympus and revived the Cyclopes.

After his death the God of Medicine was placed amongst the stars as the constellation Ophiochus (“The Serpent Holder”).

“A man must seek from heaven only that which is fitting for mortal minds, perceiving well the path before his feet, the lot that is our portion … Now if Chiron the wise dwelt still within his cave, and if some spell to charm his soul lay in the honeyed sweetness of my songs, then might I surely persuade him for men of noble mind to grant them a physician of feverish ills, some son born of Apollon”. (Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 4. 610 ff. C3rd B.C).~

Apollonius Rhodius says that the Celts, among whom Apollo was worshipped, believed that the Eridanos River once carried amber drops which were Apollo’s tears, shed because of his son’s death.

“The Keltoi (Celts), however, have another tale about these amber drops that are carried down the current [of the river Eridanos of Northern Europe]. They say they are the many tears that Apollon shed for his son Asklepios (Asclepius) when he visited the sacred people of the North. He was banished from the bright sky by his father Zeus, whom he blamed for having killed this son of his, who was borne by the Lady Koronis (Coronis) in splendid Lakereia at the mouth of the Amyros”. (Pindar, Pythian Ode 3. 5 ff C5th B.C.).~

Asclepius was worshipped all over Greece. His temples were usually built in healthy places, on hills outside the town, and near wells which were believed to have healing powers. 

The original Hippocratic Oath (C5th BC) began with the invocation “I swear by Apollo the Physician and by Asclepius and by Hygieia and Panacea and by all the gods”…

The most famous temple of Asclepius was at Epidaurus. Another famous healing temple was built approximately a century later, C3rd BC on the island of Kos, where Hippocrates, the so called “father of medicine”, may have begun his career.

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” A Sick Child brought into the Temple of Aesculapius” by John William Waterhouse (1877).

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“Supplication Before the Goddess Hygieia” by Louis Hector Leroux (19th century).

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►Gallery: “Asclepius, Apollo’s Son and Greek God of Medicine”:

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►Links Post:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asclepius
http://www.pantheon.org/articles/a/asclepius.html
https://ztevetevans.wordpress.com/2013/12/18/greek-mythology-the-story-of-the-centaurs/
http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/AsklepiasHygeia.html
https://letamendi.wordpress.com/2013/05/09/un-nino-enfermo-en-el-templo-de-esculapio-segun-un-cuadro-de-j-w-waterhouse-1877/
https://letamendi.wordpress.com/2014/07/26/higea-la-diosa-griega-de-la-salud-pintada-por-rubens/

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lpnm3

lpnm1

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

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►”My Audio Poem at @LapoesianomuerD”.

“Verano Inaugural”/ “Inaugural Summer”. [June 23rd, 2015].

My poem “Inaugural Summer” has been featured at “La Poesía no Muerde”. It is an audio poem, and I read my own poem!… The video was created by Hélène Laurent and the image belongs to Jaime Domech. I will add the translation to English as well… Check out the post here.

Mi poema “Verano Inaugural” ha sido publicado en “La Poesía no Muerde”. Se trata de un poema con audio, leído y escrito por mí… El video fue creado por Hélène Laurent y la imagen pertenece a Jaime Domech. Ver el post aquí.

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►💫La Poesía no Muerde💫~Audio Poem ~

🌟”Inaugural Summer”🌟 / 🌟”Verano inaugural”🌟 

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graffitti Lux and Murals Resa

►Buenos Aires Myth’s-Tress”:

Resa McConaghy is a Canadian Costume Designer for Film, Television & Digital Media. She is also a Collector of Street Art. She owns two blogs Art Gowns and Graffiti Lux and Mural. I submitted a few photographs of Amateur Graffiti Street Art to her second blog, after having told her about them. And… Resa liked the pics and agreed to post them on Graffiti Lux and Mural. 💫🌟!… Isn’t it wonderful?…

With that being said, I invite you to check out the post here:Buenos Aires Myth’s-Tress”. 💥🔛💥

Check out Resa’s great Blog and make sure to subscribe. You can follow Resa at Twitter too.~

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graffitti Lux and Murals Resa McConaghy

Click on the Logo to Check out Resa’s Blog.

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graffitti Lux and Murals Resa1

Click on the Image to Check out Resa’s Post.

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►Last but not Least: “Three Awards”:

I would like to thank  bloggers from Micheline’s Blog, Palabras Sosegadas and José Ángel Ordiz for nominating my blog for a Versatile Blogger Award, a Black Wolf Blogger Award and a Best Blogger Award, respectively.

I suggest you to check out these blogs and follow them, if you haven’t still done so…

•Rules for these Three Awards: ♠Thank the person who nominated you. ♠Add the logo to your post. ♠Nominate ten (10) bloggers of your choice and tell them about the nomination. 

•Notes:

-As always I am not answering questions. Hence, I will just nominate ten bloggers per award.

-If you have been nominated and want to follow the Nomination Process, just click on the award for which you have been nominated for. That way you’ll be able to grab in regular size!.~❤️💛❤️💛❤️💛~

I. Nominees for the Versatile Blogger Award: 1. Dog Kisses 2. Ali Isaac Storyteller 3. Atlas Abenteuer 4. Alex, The Shadow Girl’s Blog 5. José Ángel Ordiz 6. Alison Williams Writing 7. Palabras Sosegadas 8. The Bear Went Over The Mountain 9. Michael Bencik 10. Living With Benji

🌟★🌟★🌟

II. Nominees for the Black Wolf Blogger Award: 1. Bloggeretterized 2. Yummy Lummy Gary Lum 3. Emmanuel Muema’s Blog 4. Confessions of a Readaholic 5. Sayling Away 6. Disappearing In Plain Sight 7. Considerings 8. Parlor of Horror 9. The Blood, the Glory and the Grace 10. Nothing Under the Sun.

🌟★🌟★🌟

III. Nominees for the Best Blogger Award: 1. Micheline’s Blog 2. Dianne Gray Author 3. A Woman Wisdom 4. Never Less Than Everything 5. I Am a Girl, I Can Do This 6. An Honest Sinner  7. Mamangerie 8. Faith Simone 9. Fiction Zeal 10. The Book Nympho.

🌟★🌟★🌟

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HERA

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"The Peacock complaining to Juno", by Gustave Moreau (1881).

“The Peacock complaining to Juno”, by Gustave Moreau (1881).

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Hera (Roman equivalent: Juno) was Zeus’ wife and sister, and was raised by the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. She was the supreme goddess, patron of marriage, family and childbirth, having a special interest in protecting married women. 

Hera, like her siblings, was swallowed by her father Cronos (Rhea‘s husband) as soon as she was born.

Zeus with the help of Metis later tricked Cronos into a swallowing a potion that forced him to disgorge his offspring.

The legitimate offspring of her union with Zeus are Ares (the god of war), Hebe (the goddess of youth), Eris (the goddess of discord) and Eileithvia (goddess of childbirth).  

Johann Jakob Bachofen (“An Investigation of the Religious and Juridical Character of Matriarchy in the Ancient [1861]), considered that Hera, was originally the goddess of a matriarchal people, presumably inhabiting Greece before the Hellenes. According to this author, her activity as goddess of marriage established the patriarchal bond of her own subordination.

Her sacred animals were the cow, the lion and the peacock, and she favoured the city of  Argos.

She is usually portrayed enthroned, and crowned with the polos (a sort of crown worn by several of the Goddesses.

 ►Three Myths featuring Hera.

•The Judgement of Paris:

Hera, Aphrodite and Athena were the three goddesses who all claimed to deserved the Golden Apple of Discord, introduced by  Eris in Peleus and Thetis‘ wedding. This golden apple was labeled “For the fairest one”). Zeus chose Prince Paris of Troy to decide who was the fairest. Still, Paris could not decide, as all three were ideally beautiful, so they resorted to bribes. Hera offered Paris control over all Asia and Europe, while Athena offered wisdom, fame, and glory in battle, and Aphrodite offered the most beautiful mortal woman in the world as a wife, and he accordingly chose her. This woman was Helen of Troy, who was already married to King Menelaus of Sparta. Paris abducted Helen and her abduction would lead to the Trojan War.

Hephaestus, the son that Hera produced alone: 

Hera was jealous of Zeus’ giving birth to Athena, without recourse to her (actually with with Metis), so she gave birth to Hephaestus without him, though in some stories, he is the son of her and Zeus. Hera was then disgusted with Hephaestus’ ugliness and threw him from Mount Olympus. Hephaestus gained revenge against Hera for rejecting him by making her a magical throne which, when she sat on, did not allow her to leave. The other gods begged Hephaestus to return to Olympus to let her go, but he repeatedly refused. Dionysus got him drunk and took him back to Olympus on the back of a mule. Hephaestus released Hera after being given Aphrodite as his wife.

Heracles, disowned by Hera and… the Milky Way: 

Hera hated Heracles, being the scapegoat of the illegitimate offspring sired by Zeus. Heracles was the son of the affair Zeus had with the mortal woman Alcmene.

Thus, Heracles’ existence proved at least one of Zeus’ many illicit affairs, and Hera usually conspired against him, as a revenge for her husband’s infidelities.

Fear of Hera’s revenge led Alcmene to expose the infant Heracles, but he was taken up and brought to Hera by his half-sister Athena, who played an important role as protectress of heroes.Hera did not recognize Heracles and nursed him out of pity. Heracles suckled so strongly that he caused Hera pain, and she pushed him away. Her milk sprayed across the heavens and there formed the Milky Way. But with divine milk, Heracles had acquired supernatural powers. Athena brought the infant back to his mother, and he was subsequently raised by his parents, who had originally named him Alcides, being Heracles a derivated name.

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“Juno Borrowing the Girdle of Venus” by Guy Head (1771).

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“Hera in the House of Hephaistos William” by Blake Richmond (1902),

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 ►Gallery: “Hera, Zeus’ Wife”:

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Links Post:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hera
http://www.greekmythology.com/Olympians/Hera/hera.html

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lpnm3

lpnm1

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

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→On May 12th I had the honor to be part of a poetic challenge at La Poesía No Muerde, a great community blog of Poetry, hosted by Hélène LaurentPlease, make sure to also read the poems by Verónica, from En Humor Arte; José from Viajes al Fondo del ALSA and Johan from Johan Cladheart.

Later on, that same week a second poem written by me was also posted at La Poesía No Muerde. (May 15th).
You can check out the poems, in Spanish and translated to English, below… 
 
→ Se adjuntan dos participaciones poéticas, del 12 y 15 de Mayo, respectivamente, publicadas inicialmente en La Poesía no Muerde.
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 ►La Poesía No Muerde: “The Walking Chair” (Imagen encontró Poemas):
~“Auf Wiedersehen, Liebling”… (“Hasta pronto, querido”).~
 
Llevo mi silla a cuestas,
como la conciencia del amo en el esclavo
Mas la carga es semántica, 
por eso… el oprobio. 
 ~~~
Y las contradicciones, son ideológicas, 
cada tarde esperándome, 
se arremolinan en pantallas
Ovejas de otro rebaño.
 ~~~
Mis ventanas las abro de noche
para que las esperanzas florezcan de día.
Procuro que los ideales clavados en el cielo ideal
estallen contra las estructuras materiales.
~~~ 
Mas sólo en términos dialécticos
Mi silla potencial es sólo un bloque de madera
Qué importa el futuro si todos los días
se clavan en un cetro onmímodo.
 ~~~
Auf wiedersehen, Liebling...
Hilos de títere en sus vetas inertes, 
tejen implacables
oleajes de río… 
  ~~~
 ©2015 Amalia Pedemonte.-
guardaawesomeglitter
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auf wiedersehen

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 ►La Poesía No Muerde: “Imagen encontró (¡Otro!) Poema”.

~”Fragmento de un Final”.~

Corola tallada de pétalos sin flor.
una hoja con ápice impermeable.
Eterna y seca primavera,
rivera incipiente, sutilmente verde.

Una furtiva mirada azul
sobre un camino oscilante,
surcos muertos, árboles vacíos de hojas.
Bajo el sol inagotable del mediodía interminable.

~~~ 

Réplicas de galerías.
Redundantes sonidos.
Las palabras que no dijimos
te hacen una reverencia.

~~~ 

Tus fantasmas esculpen mis recuerdos.
Soy todo lo que fui en tu cautiverio,
persistes, con codicia te acumulas.
A cada nombre me retiro, te invoco y te devuelvo.

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Te conjuro, brisa efímera .
Nunca volverás a ser mi aire.
Escúrrete por la puerta de las sombras y el olvido
Deja de asediarme…

 ~~~ 
 ©2015 Amalia Pedemonte.-
 
guardaawesomeglitter
 
Originalmente publicado en:

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 ► Last but not Least: Special thanks to Lisardo Sobrino Fernández for his poem Aquiles, on his blog, Tiempo de Letras.

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©2015. Lisardo Sobrino Fernández. Click Here: http://www.tiempodeletras.blogspot.com.es/2015/05/aquiles.html

©2015. Lisardo Sobrino Fernández. Click on the image.

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