Posts Tagged ‘Clytie and Leucothoe’

►Greek Mythology: “Helios, the God Sun”:

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"Helios on His Chariot" (Detail) by Hans Adam Weissenkircher (Laufen, Germany 1646-1695 Graz, Austria).

“Helios on His Chariot” (Detail) by Hans Adam Weissenkircher (17th century).

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Helios was the Greek God Sun. He was also the guardian of oaths and the god of gift of sight. 

Around the time of Euripides, the sun of Helios became identified with Apollo. Helios was known by the names Sol and Phoebus in Roman mythology.

Helios was depicted as a handsome, and usually beardless, man clothed in purple robes and crowned with the shining aureole of the sun. His sun-chariot was drawn by four steeds, sometimes winged. 

As stated by Hesiod, Helios was the son of two Titans: Theia and Hyperion. In Hesiod’s “Theogony, therefore, Helios was also the brother of Eos (the goddess of Dawn) and Selene (the goddess of the Moon). It is interesting to note that the Dawn goddess Eos began the procession of morning, followed closely by her brother Helios.

According to the original myth, Helios dwelt in a golden palace located in the River Okeanos at the eastern ends of the earth. From there he emerged each dawn driving a chariot drawn by four, fiery winged steeds and crowned with the aureole of the sun. When he reached the the land of the Hesperides  (Evenings) in the West he descended into a golden cup which carried him around the northern streams of Okeanos back to his rising place in the East.

Helios was first married to his sister, Selene. Quintus Smyrnaeus makes Helios and Selene the parents of the Horae, the four Goddesses of the seasons

but overall he had many wives, among them the Oceanid Perse; from their union, Helios became the father of king Aeetes, Circe and Pasiphae, the wife of Minos and mother of the Minotaur.

Clythie was also included among Helios’ lovers. 

Clymene (Phaeton’s mother) was probably also identified with Clytie. Both of their names mean “the famous one”, and Clymene’s title Merope (“with turning face”) aptly describes the behaviour of the flower.

Helios, having loved her, abandoned her for another nymph, called Leucothea

Clythie was so angered by his treatment that she told Leucothea’s father, Orchamus, about the affair. Since Helios had defiled Leucothea, Orchamus had her put to death by burial alive in the sands.

Thus Clytie intended to win Helios back. She remained mourning Helios’ departure with neither food nor drink, for nine days on the rocks, staring at the sun, Helios. After nine days she was transformed into a heliotrope flower, the turnsole, which turns its head always to look longingly at Helios’ chariot of the sun. Modern traditions substitute the turnsole with a sunflower, which is said to turn in the direction of the sun.

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On the Left: "Clytie: Sorrow and Sunflowelite" by Frederic Leighton ( ). On the Right: "Clytie" by Evelyn De Morgan

On the Left: “Clytie: Sorrow and Sunflowelite” by Frederic Leighton (1895). On the Right: “Clytie” by Evelyn De Morgan (1887).

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"Clytie Transformed into a Sunflower" by Charles de Lafosse (17th century).

“Clytie Transformed into a Sunflower” by Charles de Lafosse (17th century).

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By the Oceanid Clymene, Helios had a son Phaeton and maybe Augeas, and three daughters, Aegiale, Aegle, and Aetheria. These three daughters and two Helios had by Neaera, Lampetie and Phaethusa, were known as the Heliades.

Phaethon was, as we said, Helios’ and the sea-nymph Clymene’ s son. In one ocassion, he drove his father’s chariot and, as he rode it alternately too close to the earth, he set the earth on fire. To stop it, Zeus killed him with a bolt of lightning. 

Another wife of Helios was the Nymph Rhode (meaning “rose” in the Greek language).

Rhode gave her name to the famous Greek island of Rhodes and Helios was the island’s patron deity and the Rhodians worshipped Helios. As a matter of fact, one of the island’s main attractions, the Colossus of Rhodes, was built in his honor.

►The Colossus of Rhodes, statue built in Helios’ honor by Chares of Lindos:

The Colossus of Rhodes was a statue of the Greek titan-god of the sun Helios, erected in the city of Rhodes, on the Greek island of the same name, by Chares of Lindos.

Being considered one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, It was constructed to celebrate Rhodes’ victory over the ruler of Cyprus, Antigonus I Monophthalmus.

The construction began in 292 BC and finished twelve years later, in 280 BC. The statue itself was over 30 meters tall.

Ancient accounts, which differ to some degree, describe the structure as being built with iron tie bars to which brass plates were fixed to form the skin. The interior of the structure, which stood on a 15-meter high white marble pedestal near the Mandraki harbor entrance, was filled with stone blocks as construction progressed.

The statue stood for 56 years until Rhodes was hit by the 226 BC Rhodes earthquake. By then, it fell over onto the land.

King Ptolomey III offered to pay for the reconstruction of the statue, but the Oracle of Delphi made the Rhodians afraid that they had offended Helios, and they declined to rebuild it.

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On the Left: Colosse de Rhodes by Sidney Barclay. Illustration by  Sidney Barclay in the book by Augé de Lassus "Voyage aux Sept merveilles du monde" (1880) On the Right: Unknown Artist's misconception of the Colossus of Rhodes from the Grolier Society's 1911 "Book of Knowledge"

On the Left: Colossus. Illustration by Sidney Barclay in de Lassus’ Book “Voyage aux Sept merveilles du monde” (1880). On the Right: Unknown Artist’s misconception of the Colossus of Rhodes from the Grolier Society’s 1911 “Book of Knowledge”.

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►The Sun God Helios featuring Other Greek Myths:

•Helios in Persephone’ Myth:

Helios saw Hades abducting Persephone. Demeter didn’t think to ask him about her missing daughter, but wandered the earth morosely for months until her friend, the witchcraft goddess Hekate suggested that Helios might have been an eye witness.

•Helios’ role when Aphrodite and Ares were caught by Hephaestus:

Helios owed Hephaestus for the cup that carries him to his morning daily starting point, which the smithy god had made for him, so when he witnessed an event of importance to Hephaestus, he didn’t keep it to himself. He hurried to reveal the affair between Hephaestus’ wife Aphrodite and Ares.

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'Apollo in His Chariot with the Hours" by  John Singer Sargent (1922-25).

‘Apollo in His Chariot with the Hours” by John Singer Sargent (1922-25).

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"Apollo in His Chariot with the Hours" (Details) by John Singer Sargent (1922-25).

“Apollo in His Chariot with the Hours” (Details) by John Singer Sargent (1922-25).

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 "Phoebus Driving his chariot" by Karl Briullov (1821).

“Phoebus Driving his chariot” by Karl Briullov (1821).

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"Apollo in his Chariot" by Luca Giordano (1683).

“Apollo in his Chariot” by Luca Giordano (1683).

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"Apollo" by Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini (18th century).

“Apollo” by Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini (18th century).

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►Links Post:
http://www.theoi.com/Titan/Helios.html
http://www.fanpop.com/clubs/greek-mythology/articles/7768/title/god-sun-helios-apollo
http://www.mythography.com/myth/welcome-to-mythography/greek-gods/spirits-1/helios/
http://www.greek-gods.info/ancient-greek-gods/helios/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clytie_(Oceanid)
http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NympheKlymene.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colossus_of_Rhodes
http://ancienthistory.about.com/od/hgodsandgoddesses/g/Helios.htm
http://jssgallery.org/paintings/mfa/Apollo_in_His_Chariot_with_the_Hours.htm
http://www.mythography.com/myth/welcome-to-mythography/greek-gods/spirits-1/helios/

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►Greek Mythology: “Aphrodite, Hephaestus, Ares and her Other Lovers”:

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"Mars and Venus Surprised by Vulcan" by Joachim Wtewael. (1601).

“Mars and Venus Surprised by Vulcan” by Joachim Wtewael. (1601).

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Hephaestus (Roman equivalent: Vulcan), the smith and craftsman of the gods, was married to Aphrodite (Roman equivalent: Venus), the goddess of love and beauty.

It was not a good  marriage because Aphrodite was as an unfaithful wife.

But Hephaestus also cheated her, for example with Athena, the Greek goddess of reason, intelligent activity, arts and literature.

Aphrodite most notable lovers were the gods Ares (God of War. Roman equivalent: Mars), Dionysius, Greek God of Wine and Fertility,  Hermes, (Greek God of herds and herald of the gods. Roman equivalent: Mercury), Zeus (King of Gods. Roman equivalent: Jupiter), Nerites (A young Sea-God who was the very first love of Aphrodite). Poseidon (Greek God of the Sea. Roman equivalent: Neptune), and the mortal, Adonis, who was Myhrra’son.

Except for a few occasions when he was overwhelmed with jealousy or resentment, Hephaestus seemed to accept this arrangement.

Aphrodite had a long love affair with Ares (Roman equivalent), the god of war and strife. Eros, god of Love, would become their son.

Ares was the great Olympian God of War, Battlelust and Manly Courage.

In Greek art he was depicted as either a mature, bearded warrior dressed in battle arms, or a nude beardless youth with helm and spear. 

Some of the more famous myths featuring the god include his adulterous affair with Aphrodite whislt she was married to Hephaestus and the slaying of Adonis, his rival for the love of Aphrodite, in the guise of a boar.

helius1Helius, the Sun God was able to see most things during the day, as he drove his sun chariot across the sky. It was one of those days that Helius witnessed Aphrodite taking her lover in her bed, while Hephaestus was absent. Helius easily recognised Ares.

So, he told everything to Hephaestus.

Hephaestus decided to take revenge on the lovers. Thus using his wit and his crafting skills he fashioned an unbreakable net and trapped the two lovers while they were in bed Hephaestus immediately walked back to his bedchamber with a host of other gods to witness the disgraced pair. Only the male Olympians appeared, while the goddesses stayed in Olympus

Poseidon tried to persuade Hephaestus to release the adulterous pair. At first, Hephaestus refused the request, because he wanted to extract the most out of his revenge, but at the end he released his wife and her love. Ares immediately fled to Thrace, while Aphrodite went to Paphos at the island of Cyprus.

According to the roman poet Ovid, Aphrodite made sure to punish the informer, the sun god Helius.

As Helius loved a nymph, named Clytie. Aphrodite made him  fall in love with another young woman, named Leucothoe, who was daughter of Orchamus (king of Persia).

Clytie became jealous of her rival, so she spread a rumour saying that she was seduced by a mortal lover. Leucothoe’s father, King Orchamus buried her alive. 

Thus, finally, Helius abandoned Clytie, and flew through the sky, driving his chariot  for nine days.

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Aphrodite and her Lovers (Source http://www.theoi.com)

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Amphora;s details. On the Left: Ares casts a spear at a Gigante from his chariot, driven by the goddess Aphrodite, while Eros aims his bow. On the Right: Aphrodite with doves  and her lover Ares. Period: Late Classic (400/350 BC).

Amphora. Details. On the Left: Ares casts a spear at a Gigante from his chariot, driven by the goddess Aphrodite, while Eros aims his bow. On the Right: Aphrodite with doves and her lover Ares. Period: Late Classic (400/350 BC).

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“Mars and Venus” by Sandro Botticelli (1483).

"Mars and Venus" by Sandro Botticelli (1483).

“Mars and Venus” by Sandro Botticelli (1483).

►Description: In the painting Venus watches Mars sleeps while two infant satyrs play carrying his armor as another rests under his arm. A fourth blows a small conch shell in his ear in an effort to wake him. Mars is sleeping the ‘little death’ which comes after making love, and not even a trumpet in his ear will wake him. The little satyrs have stolen his lance – a joke to show that he is now disarmed. The scene is set in a haunted forest, and the sense of perspective and horizon extremely tight and compact.  In the foreground, a swarm of wasps hovers around Mars’ head, possibly as a symbol that love is often accompanied by pain.

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►Aphrodite (Venus), her husband Hephaetus (Vulcan) and her lover Ares (Mars):

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►Aphrodite (Venus) and her other Lovers:

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►Links Post:
http://www.godandgoddess.com/the-goddess-aphrodite.html
http://smart-pustaka.blogspot.com.ar/2011/02/dewi-aphrodite.html 
http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/AphroditeLoves.html
http://www.timelessmyths.com/classical/lovers.html
 http://www.timelessmyths.com/classical/lovers.html
http://www.maicar.com/GML/Aphrodite.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_and_Venus_(Botticelli)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hephaestus 
http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/HephaistosLoves.html 
http://www.greek-gods.org/olympian-gods/aphrodite.php
http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/A/Ares.html

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