Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Asclepius’

metamorphoses-ovid

flowers-and-plants-in-greek-myths2

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

"The Tree of Forgiveness." by Edward Burne-Jones. 19th century.

“The Tree of Forgiveness.” by Edward Burne-Jones. 19th century.

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

_________________________________________________________________

⇒“Metamorphoses” by Ovid:

"Metamorphoses" by Ovid. Illustration by George Sandys. 1632.

“Metamorphoses” by Ovid. Illustration by George Sandys. 1632.

In my previous post, I have mentioned Ovid´s book “Metamorphoses” as a key source of Greek Mythology. 

“Metamorphoses” is a narrative poem in fifteen books by the Roman poet Ovid, completed in 8 CE.

It is a “mock-epic” poem, written in dactylic hexameter, the form of the great epic poems of the ancient tradition, such as “The Iliad” and  “The Odyssey.

This poem describes the creation and history of the world, incorporating many classical myths.

Love and hubris are main topics in Ovid´s “Metamorphoses”. 
Unlike the predominantly romantic notions of Love, Ovid considered love more as a dangerous, destabilizing force.
However, there is an explanation for this attitude: during the reign of Augustus, the Roman emperor during Ovid’s time, major attempts were made to regulate morality by creating legal and illegal forms of love, by encouraging marriage and legitimate heirs, and by punishing adultery with exile from Rome.
As to hubris, (overly prideful behaviour) Ovid emphasizes that it entails a fatal flaw which inevitably leads to a character’s downfall. Hubris always attracts the punishment of the gods, as human beings might attempt to compare themselves to divinity.
As a side note, I think the best example of hubris in a Greek Myth is the one featuring Icarus, whose father built two pairs of wings out of wax and feathers for them to escape from the Labyrinth for King Minos in which they had been imprisoned, and which had a fearsome Minotaur as guardian. Daedalus (Icarus´father) tried his wings first, but before taking off from the island, warned his son not to fly too close to the sun, nor too close to the sea, but to follow his path of flight. But soon later, Icarus was so overcome by the incredible feeling of flight, that he tried to fly higher and higher, trying to reach the sun; until, inevitably his wax wings melted, he fell from the sky into the Sea, and died.

Besides, in my last post, I introduced the subject of metamorphoses as it appears in Greek Myths, stating that it is generally defined as the origin of one or more transformations which most times occur as a result of death (tribute), but also as a way exoneration; or punishment.

Ovid. Publius Ovidius Naso. ( 43 B.C/ 17 A.D).

Ovid. Publius Ovidius Naso. ( 43 B.C/ 17 A.D).

Transformation is a common theme in Greek mythology. The gods had the power to change themselves into animals, birds, or humans and often used this power to trick goddesses or women.
In this same sense, I have previously mentioned the case of Zeus, the Ruler of Gods, who took different appearances as a way of courting potential lovers. Furthermore, sometimes the gods and goddesses transformed “others”, either to save them or to punish them.
Daphne, for example, was changed into a laurel tree; whilst Narcissus and Hyacinthus became the flowers that bear their names. 
The metamorphoses I have previously considered involved exclusively flowers, plants and trees and this post intends to present a few more examples of this sort.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  ⇒“Flowers and Plants in some Greek Myths II”:

►Minthe: A naiad, fond of Hades/ Mint Plant:

Minthe was a naiad or water nymph associated with the Underworld river Cocytus. This river (also known as the River of Wailing) was one of the five rivers that encircled the realm of Hades, alongside rivers Phlegethon, Acheron, Lethe and Styx- .

Minthe fell in love with Hades, but Persephone, Hades’ wife became enraged with jealousy, turning Minthe into a crawling plant so Persephone could crush her.

Hades could not reverse the spell so he made Minthe smell good when she walked on, making it so Minthe would always be noticed and never be taken for granted. 

The story also makes sense in a Greco-Roman context as mint was used in funerary rites to disguise the scent of decay. Besides, in Greece, the herb was also a main ingredient in the fermented barley drink called kykeon, which seemingly was the principal potable associated with the Eleusinian mysteries. It seems like this beverage included some really strange psychoactive ingredients, mint among them.

guarda_griega1_2-1

On the Left: Nymph Minthe by W. Szczepanska. 21st century. On the Right: Mint Plant.

On the Left: Nymph Minthe by W. Szczepanska. 21st century. On the Right: Mint Plant.

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•

►Crocus, friend of Hermes/Crocus Plant:

Crocus was a friend of Hermes, the messenger of the Gods and god of travellers, liars, thieves, all who cross boundaries.

One day, while they were throwing the disc to each other, Hermes hit Crocus on the head and wounded him fatally.

As the young man collapsed and was dying, three drops from his blood fell on the centre of a flower thus becoming the three stigmata of the flower named after him.

Etymologically, the word crocus has its origin from the Greek “kroki” which means weft, the thread used for weaving on a loom. 

As a medicinal and dyeing substance, crocus has been known in ancient Greece for its aroma, vibrant colour and aphrodisiac properties, thus making it one of the most desired and expensive spices.

Another use in ancient Greece was that of perfumery also using it to perfume the water while bathing. Frescoes in the palaces of Knossos (16th century b.C.) clearly depict a young girl gathering crocus flowers as well as in the archeological site of Akrotiri, in Santorini and Homer, in his writings calls dawn “a crocus veil”.

guarda_griega1_2-1-1

On the Left: "Mercury (Hermes)” Statue at the Museum Pio Clementino, Vatican. On the Right: Crocus Flower.

On the Left: “Mercury (Hermes)” Statue at the Museum Pio Clementino, Vatican. On the Right: Crocus Flower.

guarda_griega1_2-1-1

•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•

►Paean, Asclepius´pupil/ Peony, Plant of Healing:

Peony was named after Paean, who was the physician of the gods who healed, among others, Hades’ and Ares’ wounds.

The flower myth related, says that Paean was a student of Asclepius, the god of medicine and healing

Asclepius excelled as a doctor, partly because serpents helped him to discover the healing properties of certain herbs.

Unfortunately, Asclepius became so skilled that he was able to revive the dead. Angry that the son of Apollo had interfered with nature and human mortality, Zeus hurled a thunderbolt at Asclepius, killing him. However, while they understood that interfering with natural death was wrong, humans continued to worship Asclepius as the founder of medicine.

Back to Asclepius´pupil, Paean, he was once instructed by Leto (Apollo‘s mother and goddess of fertility) to obtain a magical root growing on Mount Olympus that would soothe the pain of women in childbirth.

Asclepius became jealous and threatened to kill his pupil. Zeus saved Paean from the wrath of Asclepius by turning him into the peony flower. 

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

On the Left: Statuette of Paeon . 2nd century. On the Right: Peony, flower.

On the Left: Statuette of Paean . 2nd century. On the Right: Peony, flower.

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•

►Cyparissus/ Cypress tree:

Cyparissus was a handsome young man from the island of Kea, the son of Telefus and grand son of Hercules.

He was god Apollo‘s protege as well as of god Zephiros (god of the wind). He asked the heavens for a favour; that his tears would roll down eternally. The favorite companion of Cyparissus was a tamed stag, which he accidentally killed with his hunting javelin as it lay sleeping in the woods. The gods turned him into a cypress tree, whose sap forms droplets like tears on the trunk. Therefore, the cypress tree became the tree of sorrow, and a classical symbol of mourning.

guarda_griega1_2-1-1

On the Left: "Cyparissus" (mourning his deer) by Jacopo Vignali. 1670. On the Right: Bald Cypress Leaves.

On the Left: “Cyparissus” (mourning his deer) by Jacopo Vignali. 1670. On the Right: Bald Cypress Leaves.

guarda_griega1_2-1-1

•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•

►Phyllis, Demophon´s wife/Almond Tree:

Phyllis was a daughter of a Thracian king.

She married Demophon, King of Athens and son of Theseus, while he stopped in Thrace on his journey home from the Trojan War.

Demophon, duty bound to Greece, returns home to help his father, leaving Phyllis behind. She sends him away with a casket, telling him that it contained a sacrament of Rhea and asking him to open it only if he has given up hope of returning to her. From here, the story diverges. In one version, Phyllis realizes that he will not return and commits suicide by hanging herself from a tree. Where she is buried, an almond tree grows, which blossoms when Demophon returns to he

A daughter of king Sithon, in Thrace, fell in love with Demophon on his return from Troy to Greece. Demophon promised her, by a certain day, to come back from Athens and marry her, and as he was prevented from keeping his word, Phyllis hung herself, but was metamorphosed into an almond-tree, which is a symbol of hope and rebirth.

In my previous post, I also made reference to another myth featuring an almond tree, which I will summarize here again.

This myth involved Cybele, his son Agdistis and his grandson Attis.

Medallion depicting Cybele and the sun god in the sky looking on as she rides in her chariot. 2nd century BC

Medallion depicting Cybele and Helios, the sun god in the sky looking from above as she rides in her chariot. 2nd century BC

Cybele (the so called “Great Mother”) gave birth to the hermaphroditic demon Agdistis.

Afraid of such creature, Cybele cut off his male sexual organ and from its blood sprang an almond tree.

When its fruit was ripe, Nana, who was a daughter of the river-god Sangarius, picked an almond and laid it in her bosom.

The almond disappeared, and she became pregnant.

Soon after the baby (named Attis) was born, Nana abandoned him, but a couple took care of him. 

When he was a young man, the foster parents of Attis sent him to Pessinos, where he was to wed the king’s daughter. 

Just as the marriage had started, Cybele appeared in her transcendent power, as she was jealous because she had fallen in love with Attis (his grandson).

Attis went mad, cut off his genitals and died. From Attis’ blood sprang the first violets.

guarda_griega1_2-1

On the Left: "Phyllis and Demophoön" by John William Waterhouse. 19th century. On the Right: Almond Trees.

On the Left: “Phyllis and Demophon” by John William Waterhouse. 19th century. On the Right: Almond Trees.

guarda_griega1_2-1

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•

►The Nymph Pitys/The Fir tree:
Pan, the god of the wild and shepherds, was in love with the nymph Pitys. The god of the North wind was also attracted to Pity, but the nymph chose Pan over him.
The North Wind wanted to take revenge so he blew her over a gorge and killed her.
Pan found her lifeless body laying in the gorge and turned her into sacred tree, the Fir-tree.
Ever since, every time the North wind blows, Pitys cries. Her tears are the pitch droplets that leak out of the fir-cones in autumn.
guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)
On the Left: "Pan and Pitys" by Edward Calvert. 1850. On the Right: Fir Trees.

On the Left: “Pan and Pitys” by Edward Calvert. 1850. On the Right: Fir Trees.

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•

►Rose, created by the goddess of flowers, Chloris, from a dead Nymph:

"Flora and Zephy" by Bouguereau. 1875.

“Flora and Zephy” by Bouguereau. 1875.

In Greek mythology, the rose was created by the goddess of flowers, Chloris (Roman equivalent: Flora).

One day, Chloris found the lifeless body of a nymph in the forest and she turned her into a flower.

She called Aphrodite, goddess of love, and Dionysus, the god of wine.

Aphrodite gave the flower beauty as her gift and Dionysus added nectar to give it a sweet fragrance. Zephiros, god of the West Wind, blew the clouds away so Apollo, the sun-god, could shine and make the flower bloom. That is how the rose was created and rightfully crowned “Queen of Flowers”.

guarda_griega1_2-1

On the Left: Chloris. Detail "Primavera" by Sandro Botticelli.1478. On the Right: Rose Flower.

On the Left: Chloris. Detail “Primavera” by Sandro Botticelli.1478. On the Right: Rose Flower.

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

•~~~•~~~ •~~~•~~~•~~~•~~~•

►Orchis (son of a nymph and a satyr)/Orchid Plant:

In Greek mythology, Orchis was the son of a nymph (a female nature deity typically associated with a particular location or landform) and a satyr (a rustic fertility spirits of the countryside and wilds).

During a celebratory feast for Dionysus, Orchis committed the sacrilege of attempting to rape a priestess.

His punishment was to being torn apart by wild beasts. From his death arose Orchids which are a testament to the male reproductive organs (the testis). Today, the orchid means refinement as well as beauty. The origin of the plant name comes from the word orkhis, a word to describe part of the male genitalia, because of the shape of the bulbous roots. 

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

On the Left: Fight between Nymph and Satyr. Naples National Archaeological Museum. On the Right: Orchid Plant and flowers.

On the Left: Fight between Nymph and Satyr. Naples National Archaeological Museum. On the Right: Orchid Plant and flowers.

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

 ____________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

Flowers and Plants

Flowers and Plants: Peony, Rose, Orchid, Cypress (Leaves), Crocus, Mint (Leaves), Almond Tree (Flowers), Fir Tree (Branch).

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

__________________________________________________________________________________

►Links Post:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crocus_(mythology)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyparissus
http://amphipolis.gr/en/fyllis/
http://www.valentine.gr/mythology5_en.php
http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Paion.html
http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/P/Phyllis.html
http://www.ancient-literature.com/rome_ovid_metamorphoses.html
https://tropicalfloweringzone.wordpress.com/2014/05/07/dendrobiums-orchids/
http://www.dominiquehackettchc.com/mint-wonderful-go-to-herb/
__________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

the gorgons

guarda_griega1_3-1-1-1 (1)

Perseus and Medusa by Benvenuto Cellini, (1554). Perseus with the head of Medusa. Details.

Perseus and Medusa by Benvenuto Cellini, (1554). Perseus with the head of Medusa. Details.

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

In Greek Mythology, the Gorgons were three monsters, daughters of Echidna and Typhon. Their names were Stheno (“forceful”), Euryale (“far-roaming”), and the most famous of them, Medusa (“ruler”).  Although the first two were immortal, Medusa was not, and she was slain by the demigod and hero Perseus.

It was said that their  appearance would turn anyone who laid eyes upon it to stone. The name “Gorgon”  is Greek, being derived from “gorgos” and translating as “terrible” or “dreadful”.

Hesiod in his “Theogony” imagines the Gorgons as three sea daemons and makes them the daughters of two sea deities.

Homer speaks only of one Gorgon, whose head is represented in “The Iliad”as fixed in the centre of the aegis (meaning a mirrored shield) of Athena, the Greek Goddess of Wisdom,  and whose counterpart was a device on the shield of Agamemnon.

In Homer´s “Odyssey”, the Gorgon is a monster of the underworld into which the earliest Greek deities were cast.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2 (1)

Roman mosaic from 4th C. BC found in Palencia, in the year 1869 and currently at the National archaeological Museum of Madrid.

Roman mosaic from 4th C. BC found in Palencia, in the year 1869 and currently at the National archaeological Museum of Madrid.

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

In most versions of the story, Medusa was killed by Perseus.

According to Ovid (“Metamorphoses”, book IV), the reason for the dispute between Athena and Medusa lay in Poseidon‘s rape of Medusa inside the temple of the virgin goddess.

The goddess of Wisdom was supposed to have punished Medusa by transforming her face, which therefore made Medusa an innocent victim.

As to Perseus, he was  the son of the mortal Danae (the daughter of the King of Argos) and Zeus, the Ruler of Gods.

He would later on become the legendary founder of Mycenae and of the Dynasty of Danaans

Perseus had been sent to  fetch Medusa´s head by King Polydectes of Seriphus because Polydectes wanted to marry his mother.

The gods backed up Perseus. Thus, he received a mirrored shield from Athena, gold, winged sandals from Hermes (the messenger of the Gods), a sword from Hephaestus and Hades´helm of invisibility.

Medusa was the only one of the three Gorgons who was mortal, so Perseus was able to slay her while looking at the reflection from the mirrored shield he received from Athena.

Perseus could safely cut off Medusa’s head without turning to stone, by looking only at her reflection in the shield.

During that time, Medusa was pregnant by Poseidon.

When Perseus beheaded Medusa, Medusa and Poseidon´s sons, Pegasus (a winged horse) and Chrysaor (a golden sword-wielding giant), sprang from her body.

According to other accounts, either Perseus or Athena used the head to turn Atlas into stone, transforming him into the Atlas Mountains  that held up both heaven and earth.

Many elements of the myth suggest, through its basic ambiguity, the tragic nature of Medusa.

One of the most revealing of these is the gift from Athena to Asclepius of two drops of the Gorgon’s blood, one of which has the power to cure and even resurrect, while the other is a deadly poison.

In his study “The Mirror of Medusa” (1983), Tobin Siebers has identified the importance of two elements, i.e. the rivalry between Athena and the Gorgon, and the mirror motif.

As to the mirror motif, common features are numerous. For example, snakes are the attribute of Athena, as illustrated by the famous statue of Phidias. 

With regard to symbolisms and equivalents, it is interesting to highlight that in Ancient Greece a Gorgoneion (a stone head, engraving, or drawing of a Gorgon face), frequently was used as a sacred symbol in the hopes of warding off evil.

These symbols were similar to the sometimes grotesque faces on Chinese soldiers’ shields, also used generally as an amulet. Likewise, in Hindu mythology, Kali is often shown with a protruding tongue and snakes around her head. Medusa is, besides, one of the most archaic mythical figures, perhaps an echo of the demon Humbaba who was decapitated by the babylonian hero, Gilgamesh.

David Leeming in his book: “Medusa: In the Mirror of Time” (2013) traces the development of Medusa from her earliest appearances in Archaic art and poetry to her more recent incarnations. Leeming makes reference to Jean Pierre Vernant several times in his book.

Particularly he mentions Vernant´s  essay “In The Mirror of Medusa” (1985), in which he examines Medusa in the context of archaic Greek religious life.

Leeming second Vernant when he states that Medusa is basically “a mask conveying the Ultimate Other”. They both believe that Medusa represented the death power which “wrenches humans away from their lives”. (“To gaze at the Other, which is the Medusa mask is to lose the Self, to be petrified”).

Robert Graves (“Greek Myths”, 1958) believes that the myth of Perseus preserves the memory of the conflicts which occurred between men and women in the transition from a matriarchal to a patriarchal society. 

In fact, the function of the Gorgon’s mask was to keep men at a safe distance from the sacred ceremonies and mysteries reserved for women, meaning, those which celebrated the Triple Goddess, the Moon.

Graves reminds us that the Orphic poems referred to the full moon as the “Gorgon’s head”. The mask was also worn by young maidens to ward off male lust.

Consequently, according to Robert Graves, the episode of Perseus’ victory over Medusa represents the end of female ascendancy and the taking over of the temples by men, who had become the masters of the divine which Medusa’s head had concealed from them.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2 (1)

“La Méduse” by Jean Delville. 1893

guarda_griega1_2 (1)

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

►Gallery: “The Gorgons”: 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

“Medusa” by Arnold Böcklin (On the Left: 1878. On the Right: 1897).

guarda_griega1_2-1 (1)

“The Gorgon Medusa”, by Caravaggio. (1590).

guarda_griega1_2 (1)

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

►Links Post:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gorgon
http://www.rwaag.org/medusa
http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2014/2014-08-09.html
https://books.google.com.ar/books?id=vQqIWcgAxhIC&redir_esc=y
http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/bogan/medusamyth.htm
https://dearkitty1.wordpress.com/2008/12/25/medusa-inspired-art-on-show/

gorgon3

 •~~~•  •~~~ • •~~~• •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

  Last but not Least: “Three Awards” 

Thank you very much to bloggers from Time for my Thoughts, Jully´s Blog and Dear Kitty for nominating me for a Blogger Recognition Award, a Creative Blogger Award and a Real Neat Blog Award, respectively.

I will follow these basic rules for these three awards: 

♠Thank the person who nominated you. ♠Add the logo to your post. ♠Nominate ten (10) bloggers of your choice and tell them about the nomination. 

I. Nominees Blogger Recognition Award: 1. Natascha’s Palace 2. Art Box 3. Way Station 4. Book lover circumspect4 5. WolfBerryKnits 6. Cheryl “Cheffie Cooks” Wiser 7. Blabberwockying 8. Ricettedicasamia 9. Missameliaandsir 10. Keep The Hope.

•~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~• 

II. Nominees Creative Blogger Award: 1. Dreamspinner Extraordinaire 2. La Luna Escarlata 3. Spiritual Dragonfly 4. Trees of Transition 5. Stephanie’s Book Reviews 6. Collage a la intemperie 7. Breathe In My Touch 8.Time for my Thoughts 9. Dear Kitty 10. Of Means and Ends.

•~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~• 

III. Nominees Real Neat Blog Award:  1. Joys of Joel 2. Soul Synchronicity 3. Be Different Buddy 4. Ionic Bond Blog 5. El Mejor Viaje del Mundo 6. Nearly Dear 7. Jully´s Blog 8. Diana Douglas 9. All Nine 10. Imperfect Happiness.

•~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~• 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda21

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

the centaurs

guarda_griega1_7

“Centaur and Cupid” by Gustave Moreau. 19th century.

guarda_griega1_7

________________________________________________________________

The Centaurs were a tribe of half man, half horse savages which inhabited the mountains and forests of Magnesia. 

Another tribe of Centaurs resided in the western Peloponnese where they came into conflict with the hero Heracles.

The centaurs were usually said to have been born of Ixion and Nephele (the cloud made in the image of Hera, Zeus‘ Wife):

Ixion fell in love with Hera and tried to rape her, and when Hera told Zeus about it, Zeus wanted to determine if her report was really true. So he fashioned a cloud (nephele) to look like Hera, and laid it by Ixion’s side. When Ixion bragged that he had slept with Hera, Zeus punished him by tying him to a wheel, on which he was turned by winds up in the air. The cloud bore Kentauros (Centaurus) from Ixion’s seed. [Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca E1. 20 C2nd A.D.)].~

In the  earliest accounts, the centaurs appear merely as a sort of gigantic, savage, or animal-like beings; whereas, in later writers, they are described as monsters, with the upper body of a man, from head to loins, set upon the body of a horse.

Sometimes, they had the facial feature of a man, at other times they were portrayed with the snub nose and pointed ears of a rustic Satyr.

It is probably owing to the resemblance between the nature of the centaurs and that of the satyrs, that the former were in later times drawn into the sphere of Dionysiac beings; but here they appear no longer as savage monsters, but as tamed by the power of the god.

They are described as leading a rude and savage life, occasionally carrying off the women of their neighbours, as covered with hair and ranging over their mountains like animals. 

The Centaurs are best known for their fight against their cousins, The Lapith tribe, a legendary people of Greeks, whose home was in Thesaly. This fight was caused by the Centaurs’ attempt attempt to carry off  Princess Hippodamia and the rest of the Lapith women on the day of Hippodamia’s marriage to Pirithous, king of  Lapithae.

Pirithous and his friend, Theseus, led the Lapiths to victory over the Centaurs in a battle known as Centauromachy.

The kentauros had come to the Lapithai’s country, and now with wine he clouded his understanding and in his frenzy did monstrous things in the very hall of Peirithoos. The heroes were seized with indignation; they leapt up, they dragged the kentauros across the courtyard and out of doors, they lopped off his ears and nose with the ruthless bronze, and the frenzied creature went his way, taking his retribution with him in his still darkened mind. From this beginning came the long feud between men and Kentauroi (Centaurs) [Homer, Odyssey 21. 293 ff (Greek epic C8th B.C.)].~

The centaur is incorporated into the Zodiac sign for Sagittarius, with the bow and arrow, whose symbolism could be understood as a shamanic reference to mystic or visionary travel.

Centaurs are the antithesis of the knight and the horseman. Instead of mastering or taming their instincts, the centaurs are ruled by them. The exception is the wise Centaur Chiron.

Chiron’s mother was the nymph Philyra who was coupling with Cronos when his wife suddenly appeared on the scene. To escape notice he transformed himself into a horse, and in this way sired a half-equine son.

Chiron’s physical appearance often differs somewhat from other centaurs, demonstrating his status and heritage. In traditional Greek representations of Chiron his front legs are human, rather than equine, this is in contrast to the traditional representation of centaurs,which have the entire lower body of a horse. This clearly sets Chiron apart from the other centaurs, making him easily identifiable.

Besides, centaurs were notorious for being wild and lusty, overly indulgent drinkers and carousers, given to violence when intoxicated. Chiron, by contrast Chiron was notable throughout Greek mythology for his youth-nurturing nature. 

Myths in the Olympian tradition attributed Chiron’s uniquely peaceful character and intelligence to teaching by Apollo and his sister Artemis.

Chiron would also teach Apollo’s son, Asclepius, and Achilles, the best fighter of the Greeks besieging Troy in the Trojan War.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2-1

“Walking Ride”, by Franz von Stuck (1903).

guarda_griega1_2-1

“Pallas and Centaur” by Sandro Botticell (1482).

guarda_griega1_2-1

_____________________________________________________________________________

Gallery: “The Centaurs”:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1-1 (1)

_____________________________________________________________________________

►Links Post:
http://www.ancient.eu/centaur/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centaur
http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/KentauroiThessalioi.html
http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/KentaurosKheiron.html
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippodamia_(wife_of_Pirithous)

_____________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_7

_________________________________________________________________

lpnm3

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

_____________________________________________________________________________________

►”My Audio Poem at La Poesía no Muerde”:

~”Tiempo Perpetuo”/ “Perpetual Time”. [July 14th, 2015].~

In this occasion, my poem “Perpetual Time” has been featured at “La Poesía no Muerde”. I both wrote and read the poem. The video poem was created by Hélène Laurent. Check out the original post here.

En este caso, mi poema “Tiempo Perpetuo” ha sido publicado en “La Poesía no Muerde”. Se trata de un poema con audio, leído y escrito por mí. El video fue creado por Hélène Laurent. Consultar el post orginal aquí.

•~~~•  •~~~ • •~~~• •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•

_____________________________________________________________________________________

►La Poesía no Muerde~Audio Poem ~

“Tiempo Perpetuo”  / “Perpetual Time” 

_________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_7

~Perpetual Time~
 
And now …
Where do our memories remain,
those dark splendors?
These barren wastelands were springs
and blue rains,
fruitful outdoors;
Now just grooves of Time … 
~~~  
Cracks of your footsteps.
Surreptitious hollows and shadows.
Unrelenting water flows,
like a river of time.
~~~ 
From a subterraneous mirror drops gurgling.
Your hand exchanging movements,
trapping me inside the storm that precedes any drought.
An hourglass, greedy, thirsty. 
 ~~~ 
And a thousand ships crossing the Lethe,
the salty river of forgetfulness .
Thirst and desire, outsider lighthouses.
All memory is dryness,
vague journey  from Present to Past. 
~~~ 
 Echo, repetition
[Echo] …
dissolved into nothing.
Your summer fertility
turns against me.
~~~
Crater of fire.
Unattainable …
Wind setback,
disintegrating summer abysses  
Beaches devastated by your flames
like a cup filled with ashes.
Legacy of a temporary fold …
Lost constellations.
—–
guarda01
© Amalia Pedemonte. 2015.~

guarda_griega1_7

_________________________________________________________________

►Last but not Least: “Three Awards”:

I would like to thank  bloggers from 4 Years Old Adult, The Wall Gallery Blog and Ser un Ser de Luz for nominating my blog for a Brotherhood Award, a Creative Blogger Award and a Bor Litarcihis Award, respectively.

I suggest you to check out these blogs and follow them, if you haven’t still done so…

•Rules for the Brotherhood Award and Creative Blogger Award: ♠Thank the person who nominated you. ♠Add the logo to your post. ♠Nominate ten (10) bloggers of your choice and tell them about the nomination. 

•Notes:

-As always I am not answering questions. Hence, I will just nominate ten bloggers per award.

-If you have been nominated and want to follow the Nomination Process, just click on the award for which you have been nominated for. That way you’ll be able to grab in regular size!.~🍃 🍃🍃 ~

I. Nominees for the Brotherhood Award: 1. Mind Love Misery 2. Henry West 3. Truels 4 . BerlinArt2 5. Round World and Me 6. The Reading Bud 7. The Wall Gallery Blog 8. Ser un Ser de Luz 9. Kintal 10. Aqua Compass 7.

•~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•

II. Nominees for the Creative Blogger Award: 1. Tuesdays with Laurie 2. Voices from the Margins 3. Renne Johnson Writes 4 . Upchucking Words 5. Fiesta Estrella 6. Close to Eighty 7. Friendly Fairy Tales 8. Mieux Vivre Jardin 9. 4 Year Old Adult 10. Implied Spaces.

•~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•

III. Nominees for the Bor Litarcihis Award: I will follow Silvia´s rules in this case. And I will leave this Award open to all bloggers who want to pick it up and pass it on to other bloggers. 

•~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

►Bonustrack. Some recent Photographs ….

Selfies and Evening Views. Buenos Aires

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

guarda

________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

asclepius

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

“The Offering to Asclepius” by Pierre Narcisse Guerin (1803).

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

______________________________________________________________________________________

“Gentle Asclepius, that craftsman of new health for weary limbs and banisher of pain, the godlike healer of all mortal sickness”.
[Pindar, Pythian Ode 3. 5 ff. C5th BC].

Asclepius (Roman equivalent: Aesculapius) was the son of Apollo and a mortal woman named Coronis.

While Coronis was with Apollo, she became enamoured with Ischys, an Arcadian, and Apollo was informed of this by a raven, which he had set to watch her, or, according to Pindar, by his own prophetic powers.

Apollo sent his own sister, Artemis to kill Coronis. Presumably, Artemis destroyed Coronis in her own house at Lacereia in Thessaly.

According to Ovid, it was Apollo himself who killed Coronis and Ischys.

When the body of Coronis was to be burnt, Apollo, or, according to others Hermes, the messenger of the Gods, saved the child (Asclepius) cutting him from her womb.

From this fact, he received the name Asclepius, “to cut open”.

Apollo carried the baby to the Centaur Chiron who raised Asclepius and instructed him in the Art of Medicine.

After Asclepius had grown up, it was said that he not only cured all the sick, but called the dead to life again. About the manner in which he acquired this latter power, according to Apollodorus, he had received from Athena the blood which had flowed from the veins of Gorgo and the blood which had flowed from the veins of the right side of her body possessed the power of restoring the dead to life. [Note~ Gorgo: One of three winged daemon, it should have been Medusa as she was the only mortal among them].

Asclepius was married to Epione, with whom he had five daughters: Hygieia, Panacea, Aceso, Iaso and Aglaea and three sons: Machaon, Podaleirios and Telesphoros

The names of his daughters each rather transparently reflect a certain subset of the overall theme of “good health”. 

Hygiea was the Goddess of Good Health and a companion of the goddess Aphrodite. Panacea was the Goddess of All-Cure. Iaso was the Goddess of Remedy. Aceso was the Goddess of healing and curing. And Aglaea was the Goddess of Natural Beauty.

Some accounts say that Asclepius was killed because after bringing people back from the dead, Hades thought that no more dead spirits would come to the underworld, so he asked his brother Zeus to stop him. Zeus did so, with a flash of lightning. 

“[Asclepius] a healer for mankind of all their maladies and ills . . . And yet to profit even the skills of wisdom yield themselves captive. For a lordly bribe, gold flashing in the hand, even this man [Asclepius] was tempted to bring back to life one whom the jaws of death had seized already. With fierce hands swiftly the son of Cronos [Zeus] loosed his anger on these two; his blazing bolt stripped from them both their breath of life, and hurled them to their fate”. (Pindar, Pythian Ode 3. 54. C5th BC).~

Asclepius’s father, Apollo was angered, so in return he killed the three Cyclopes, one-eyed inmortal Giants who had made the thunderbolts for Zeus.

For this act, Zeus suspended Apollo from the night sky and commanded Apollo to serve the King of Thessaly.

Once the year had passed, Zeus brought Apollo back to Mount Olympus and revived the Cyclopes.

After his death the God of Medicine was placed amongst the stars as the constellation Ophiochus (“The Serpent Holder”).

“A man must seek from heaven only that which is fitting for mortal minds, perceiving well the path before his feet, the lot that is our portion … Now if Chiron the wise dwelt still within his cave, and if some spell to charm his soul lay in the honeyed sweetness of my songs, then might I surely persuade him for men of noble mind to grant them a physician of feverish ills, some son born of Apollon”. (Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 4. 610 ff. C3rd B.C).~

Apollonius Rhodius says that the Celts, among whom Apollo was worshipped, believed that the Eridanos River once carried amber drops which were Apollo’s tears, shed because of his son’s death.

“The Keltoi (Celts), however, have another tale about these amber drops that are carried down the current [of the river Eridanos of Northern Europe]. They say they are the many tears that Apollon shed for his son Asklepios (Asclepius) when he visited the sacred people of the North. He was banished from the bright sky by his father Zeus, whom he blamed for having killed this son of his, who was borne by the Lady Koronis (Coronis) in splendid Lakereia at the mouth of the Amyros”. (Pindar, Pythian Ode 3. 5 ff C5th B.C.).~

Asclepius was worshipped all over Greece. His temples were usually built in healthy places, on hills outside the town, and near wells which were believed to have healing powers. 

The original Hippocratic Oath (C5th BC) began with the invocation “I swear by Apollo the Physician and by Asclepius and by Hygieia and Panacea and by all the gods”…

The most famous temple of Asclepius was at Epidaurus. Another famous healing temple was built approximately a century later, C3rd BC on the island of Kos, where Hippocrates, the so called “father of medicine”, may have begun his career.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2-1

” A Sick Child brought into the Temple of Aesculapius” by John William Waterhouse (1877).

guarda_griega1_2-1

“Supplication Before the Goddess Hygieia” by Louis Hector Leroux (19th century).

guarda_griega1_2-1

_____________________________________________________________________________________

►Gallery: “Asclepius, Apollo’s Son and Greek God of Medicine”:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

_____________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_7

__________________________________________________________________________________

►Links Post:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asclepius
http://www.pantheon.org/articles/a/asclepius.html
https://ztevetevans.wordpress.com/2013/12/18/greek-mythology-the-story-of-the-centaurs/
http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/AsklepiasHygeia.html
https://letamendi.wordpress.com/2013/05/09/un-nino-enfermo-en-el-templo-de-esculapio-segun-un-cuadro-de-j-w-waterhouse-1877/
https://letamendi.wordpress.com/2014/07/26/higea-la-diosa-griega-de-la-salud-pintada-por-rubens/

________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_7

_____________________________________________________________________________________

lpnm3

lpnm1

Click above to visit the blog / Click en el logo para ingresar al blog.~

______________________________________________________________________________________

►”My Audio Poem at @LapoesianomuerD”.

“Verano Inaugural”/ “Inaugural Summer”. [June 23rd, 2015].

My poem “Inaugural Summer” has been featured at “La Poesía no Muerde”. It is an audio poem, and I read my own poem!… The video was created by Hélène Laurent and the image belongs to Jaime Domech. I will add the translation to English as well… Check out the post here.

Mi poema “Verano Inaugural” ha sido publicado en “La Poesía no Muerde”. Se trata de un poema con audio, leído y escrito por mí… El video fue creado por Hélène Laurent y la imagen pertenece a Jaime Domech. Ver el post aquí.

•~~~•  •~~~ • •~~~• •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•

_____________________________________________________________________________________

►💫La Poesía no Muerde💫~Audio Poem ~

🌟”Inaugural Summer”🌟 / 🌟”Verano inaugural”🌟 

____________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

inaugural summer1

guarda_griega1_3-1-1 (1)

_____________________________________________________________________________________

graffitti Lux and Murals Resa

►Buenos Aires Myth’s-Tress”:

Resa McConaghy is a Canadian Costume Designer for Film, Television & Digital Media. She is also a Collector of Street Art. She owns two blogs Art Gowns and Graffiti Lux and Mural. I submitted a few photographs of Amateur Graffiti Street Art to her second blog, after having told her about them. And… Resa liked the pics and agreed to post them on Graffiti Lux and Mural. 💫🌟!… Isn’t it wonderful?…

With that being said, I invite you to check out the post here:Buenos Aires Myth’s-Tress”. 💥🔛💥

Check out Resa’s great Blog and make sure to subscribe. You can follow Resa at Twitter too.~

__________________________________________________________________________________________

graffitti Lux and Murals Resa McConaghy

Click on the Logo to Check out Resa’s Blog.

guarda_griega1_2-1

graffitti Lux and Murals Resa1

Click on the Image to Check out Resa’s Post.

guarda_griega1_2-1

____________________________________________________________________________________

►Last but not Least: “Three Awards”:

I would like to thank  bloggers from Micheline’s Blog, Palabras Sosegadas and José Ángel Ordiz for nominating my blog for a Versatile Blogger Award, a Black Wolf Blogger Award and a Best Blogger Award, respectively.

I suggest you to check out these blogs and follow them, if you haven’t still done so…

•Rules for these Three Awards: ♠Thank the person who nominated you. ♠Add the logo to your post. ♠Nominate ten (10) bloggers of your choice and tell them about the nomination. 

•Notes:

-As always I am not answering questions. Hence, I will just nominate ten bloggers per award.

-If you have been nominated and want to follow the Nomination Process, just click on the award for which you have been nominated for. That way you’ll be able to grab in regular size!.~❤️💛❤️💛❤️💛~

I. Nominees for the Versatile Blogger Award: 1. Dog Kisses 2. Ali Isaac Storyteller 3. Atlas Abenteuer 4. Alex, The Shadow Girl’s Blog 5. José Ángel Ordiz 6. Alison Williams Writing 7. Palabras Sosegadas 8. The Bear Went Over The Mountain 9. Michael Bencik 10. Living With Benji

🌟★🌟★🌟

II. Nominees for the Black Wolf Blogger Award: 1. Bloggeretterized 2. Yummy Lummy Gary Lum 3. Emmanuel Muema’s Blog 4. Confessions of a Readaholic 5. Sayling Away 6. Disappearing In Plain Sight 7. Considerings 8. Parlor of Horror 9. The Blood, the Glory and the Grace 10. Nothing Under the Sun.

🌟★🌟★🌟

III. Nominees for the Best Blogger Award: 1. Micheline’s Blog 2. Dianne Gray Author 3. A Woman Wisdom 4. Never Less Than Everything 5. I Am a Girl, I Can Do This 6. An Honest Sinner  7. Mamangerie 8. Faith Simone 9. Fiction Zeal 10. The Book Nympho.

🌟★🌟★🌟

______________________________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________________________

guardaglittering

______________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

apollo00

guarda_griega1_7

“Apollo Receiving the Shepherds’ Offerings” by Gustave Moreau (1895).

guarda_griega1_7

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Apollo was the son of Zeus and Leto.

The Roman worship of Apollo was adopted from the Greeks. Apollo had no direct Roman equivalent, although later Roman poets often referred to him as Phoebus.

Apollo had a twin sister, Artemis, the Goddess of Hunting.

Mythographers agree that Artemis was born first and then assisted with the birth of Apollo, or that Artemis was born one day before Apollo, on the island of Ortygia and that she helped Leto cross the sea to Delos the next day to give birth to Apollo.

As the patron of Delphi, Apollo was an oracular go, the prophetic deity of the Delphic Oracle.

As the god of prophecy. Apollo exercised this power in his numerous oracles, and especially in that of Delphi. The source of all his prophetic powers was Zeus himself and Apollo is accordingly called “the prophet of his father Zeus”. According to Apollodorus, the oracle had previously been in the possession of Themis, and the dragon Python guarded the mysterious chasm, and Apollo, after having slain the monster, took possession of the oracle.

Apollo  was also known as “the god who affords help and wards off evil”. He had the power of visiting men with plagues and epidemics, so he was also able to deliver men from them.

Apollo was furthermore depicted as the God of Music. This is shown particularly on the Iliad, in which he appears delighting the immortal gods with his play on the phorminx during their repast. Besides, the Homeric bards derived their art of song either from Apollo or the Muses.
He was also considered a God related to the Foundation of Towns. His assistance in the building of Troy was very important, respecting his aid in raising the walls of Megara.
Medicine and healing  were associated with Apollo too, whether through the god himself or mediated through his son Asclepius.
Coronis was Apollo’s lover and Asclepius’ mother. She was a princess of the Thessalian kingdom of Phlegyantis. 
When she was pregant with his son, Coronis committed adultery with a man named Ischys (“the Mighty”).
Apollo knew it as he had commanded his divine messenger, the white  raven, to guard Coronis. When the raven brought news to Apollo of his lover’s infidelity, the god, angered at the bird, turned the raven’s white feathers black. Apollo killed Ischys and sent his sister, Artemis, to destroy her.
Apollo’s sister, Artemis, slew Coronis with her deadly arrows.
Whilst Coronis was burning on the pyre Apollo made sure to  remove his son (Asclepius) from her womb and he gave it to the Chiron, (son of Cronus, Zeus’ Father and God of time and the ages,  and the Oceanid Nymph, Philyra), who was as the eldest and wisest of the Centaurs, a tribe of half-horse men. 
Coronis was later placed amongst the stars as the constellation Corvus (“the Crow”).
 
In Hellenistic times, especially during the 3rd century BCE, as Apollo Helios he became identified among Greeks with Helios, God of the Sun, and his sister Artemis similarly equated with Selene, Goddess of the Moon.
Furthermore, the Horae could be related to the portions of time of the Day (twelve hours for the Ancient Greeks) These Horae oversaw the path of the Sun-God Helios (Apollo) as he travelled across the sky, dividing the day into its portions.

Apollo was worshipped throughout the Roman Empire. In the Celtic lands he was most often seen as a Healing and Sun God.

He was often equated with Celtic Gods of similar characteristics. [Read more on the Celtic version of Apollo at Linnea Tanner’s blog, “Apollo’s Raven”: “Ancient Celtic Religion: Apollo, God of Sun” and “Apollo and Coronis; White Raven; Association with Healing”].-

__________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2-1

“Apollo and The Nine Muses” by Gustave Moreau (1856).

guarda_griega1_2-1

“Apollo with Urania, Muse of Astronomy” by Charles Meynier (1800).

guarda_griega1_2-1

_______________________________________________________________________________________

►Gallery: “Apollo, Zeus and Leto’s Son”:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_7

___________________________________________________________________________

►Links Post:
http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Apollon.html
http://www.theoi.com/Heroine/Koronis.html
https://ledrakenoir.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/a-divine-day-as-apollon/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo
http://www.linneatanner.com/blog/apollo-god-of-healing/
http://www.linneatanner.com/blog/ancient-celtic-religion-apollo-god-of-sun/
https://ztevetevans.wordpress.com/2015/03/25/spirituality-the-raven-totem/

______________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_7

______________________________________________________________________________________

hymn
And if you hear me, mighty god, with bow and distant eye,
but heed my voice of light turned dark, receive my weary cry!
You maker of contagion, you the master of the Muse,
set her singing through my clumsy mouth, and please do not refuse.
 
~~~
You, the distant deadly archer
who rains his arrows on the earth,
who sees coming and departure
and who predicts both death and birth;
time sets for you no mystery,
dread harbinger of history,
who knows the subtle things that grow
in crowded towns or fields we sow.
You send us both the plagues that spread
and the uncertain art to heal;
what mysteries may you conceal,
unveiling only for the dead?
But let us know your hidden mind,
to see with courage what we find!
 
~~~
 
With courage let us join in song,
in music, rise above.
A life so short and very long
we sing, and hope to love.
 
~~~
 
Your flame, it burns our deepest hearts,
and each one fears it’s something wrong;
a boiling teapot sudden starts
to drown the heat in giving song.
Although it is a mark of shame,
a teapot is not much to blame.
And how much less should we be bad
to turn to song our feeling sad?
This music is your sweetest gift,
you gloried god of structured sound;
to you our song and voice resound,
in love and gratitude uplift.
For though it springs from snapping bone,
in music we are not alone.
 
~~~
 
And if you hear us, mighty god, with bow and distant eye,
but heed this voice of light turned dark, receive our weary cry!
You maker of contagion, you the master of the Muse,
set her singing through our clumsy mouths, and please do not refuse.

~~~

©Copyright 2015. Geofrey Crow.-

guarda01

_____________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_2-1

Geofrey Crow.-

Geofrey Crow.-

guarda_griega1_2-1

_____________________________________________________________________________

►🌟About Geofrey Crow 🌟

Geofrey dixit: I am an apprentice poet and fiction writer, working to learn the skill of turning life into words, and the even greater skill of turning words into life. I love pretty pictures, distant dreams, and silent sleep. More than anything else I am a lover of words, of the way words can bring us together and allow us, so briefly, to feel ourselves echoed in another’s thoughts. I write because literature can lift us out of ourselves, put us into another person’s mind, and, for a moment, reconcile us to our so solitary condition. If I can learn to do that, maybe in some small way I’ll have justified a part of my existence.

•~~~•  •~~~ • •~~~• •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•

•Make sure to visit Geofrey’s Blog, The Giggling Stream

•Feel Free to connect with Geofrey at: Twitter, Facebook and Google Plus.

•~~~•  •~~~ • •~~~• •~~~•  •~~~•  •~~~•

_____________________________________________________________________________________

►💫 Literary Magazine Salto Al Reverso #7  Is out! 💫  …

And my Brief Story “Otro Cortado” has been featured on Page 40.

►Ya está publicada la Séptima Edición de la Revista Salto Al Reverso …

Y, mi relato “Otro Cortado” ha sido publicado en la Página 40.

guarda_griega1_5-2 (1)

Revista Salto al reverso #7 (Click).

Revista Salto al reverso #7 (Click!).

guarda_griega1_5-2 (1)

guarda_griega1_7

Salto al Reverso #7. Click to Read. Hacer Click para leer.

Salto al Reverso #7. Click on the image above to Read. Hacer Click para leer.

guarda_griega1_7

oc

Salto al Reverso #7. Click and Scroll down to page 40 to read my brief story. Hacer Click e ir a la página 40 para leer mi relato.

guarda_griega1_7

______________________________________________________________________________________

►💫Quote Challenge💫 

My blogger friends Sylvester from Syl65’s Blog and Marlyn from Kintal have invited me for a so called 3-Day Quote Challenge.

The rules of the challenge are: ♠Post your favorite quotes or your own quotes for three (3) posts in a row. ♠Thank the person who nominated you. ♠Pass it on to three (3) other bloggers per quote, each time you post them. Or pass it to nine (9) bloggers if you choose to post all the quotes together, in the same post.

⚠ Note: I will post the three (3) quotes at once. Thus I will nominate nine (9) Bloggers. Also, I thought It would be fun to add those three quotes on personal photographs… So that’s what I did! 😀

My nominees for the Quote Challenge are: 1. Deanne’ s World 2. The Girl Has No Name 3. An Elephant Called Buddha 4. Mumbai Metro Mess 5. The Raven’s Nest 6. Mithai Mumblezz 7. Fiesta Estrellas 8. Before Sundown 9. Send Sunshine.

► 🌟Three Quotes, and some Old Photographs🌟

~(Featuring My Family and Me)~ Click on the images to read ~

___________________________________________________________________________________

guarda_griega1_7

________________________________________________________________________________

►💫 Last but not Least: “Three Awards”💫

I would like to thank  bloggers from Emmanuel Muema’s Blog, Don’t Cha Wanna Dream and Belinda Crane for nominating my blog for a Creative Blogger Award, and two  Sisterhood of The World Bloggers Awards, respectively.

I suggest you to check out these blogs and follow them, if you haven’t still done so…

•Rules for these Three Awards: ♠Thank the person who nominated you. ♠Add the logo to your post. ♠Nominate ten (10) bloggers of your choice and tell them about the nomination. 

•Notes:

-As always I am not answering questions. Hence, I will just nominate ten bloggers per award.

-If you have been nominated and want to follow the Nomination Process, just click on the award for which you have been awarded to. That way you’ll be able to grab in regular size!.~ 💗💖💕

 💥🍒 💥🍒
II. Nominees for the Sisterhood of The World Bloggers Award (I)1. Sacred Touches 2. Poetheart 3. Tales from the Fairies 4. Debbie Robson 5. Raine Fairy 6. Big Body Beautiful 7. Peaceful Warrior 8. Spicy Road 9. Of Opinions 10. Cappy Writes.
💥🍒 💥🍒

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

guarda21

___________________________________________________________________________________

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: